This website is made possible by generous donations from users just like you. $18 helps keep JWA online for one day. As we celebrate Women’s History Month—and Purim and Passover—this month, please consider a gift to JWA today!
Close [x]

You are here

Share Share Share Share Share Share Share


Smashing the Patriarchy with YA Literature

If you’ve ever been a teenage girl, chances are you know what it’s like to hate your body. This isn’t an accident: when you’re born female in America, you immediately embark on a lifelong lesson on how to police your own body and the bodies of others.

Queer History and Stone Butch Blues

Two years ago to the month, I read Stone Butch Blues for the first time. Leslie Feinberg had made previous appearances in my life, distant traces of hir legacy filtering through references in other books and news of hir death months prior, but it wasn’t until May/June 2015 that I finally sank into Feinberg’s oeuvre and felt the force of hir most famous book.

Feminism, Podcasted: an Interview with The Book of Life's Heidi Rabinowitz

Podcasts are all the rage these days, but Heidi Rabinowitz’s The Book of Life podcast is no flash in the pan: on the contrary, this show about Jewish authors, books, and arts has been going strong for twelve years. Chances are if you’re a podcast fan or a Jewish book fan or both, you’ve heard this show somewhere, maybe even on JWA: a Book of Life episode recently appeared here as tie-in content to our May Book Club pick, Marjorie Ingall’s parenting g

RVF Alumna Spotlight: Caroline Kubzansky

This interview spotlights Caroline Kubzansky, a senior at Washington DC’s Edmund Burke School and an alumna of the 2015-2016 cohort of JWA's Rising Voices Fellowship. She was interviewed by fellow RVF alumna, Abby Richmond. 

Abby Richmond: What have you been up to this year?

Caroline Kubzansky: So, the biggest thing is that I got into college (University of Chicago)!

Lea Hurvitz

Lea Beninson Hurvitz’s memoirs document not only her own life but the struggles of other women pioneers of the First Aliyah, whose experiences were rarely discussed.

Jenny Hirsch

Jenny Hirsch devoted years to a society for women’s employment, but when the organization ironically refused to pay her, she reinvented herself as a mystery writer.

Etty Hillesum

Like Anne Frank, Etty Hillesum kept a diary poetically describing her life under Nazi rule, but her open discussion of her spiritual and sexual exploration prevented it from being published until 1981.

Judith Herzberg

Judith Herzberg has been hailed as one of the greatest living Dutch poets for her ability to imbue everyday objects with unexpected meaning.

Joanne Greenberg

Under the pen name Hannah Green, Joanna Greenberg turned her struggle with mental illness into the bestselling novel I Never Promised You a Rose Garden.

Frances Kroll Ring

As F. Scott Fitzgerald’s secretary and confidante in his final years, Frances Kroll Ring had a unique view of the famed author’s private self.


How to cite this page

Jewish Women's Archive. "Writing." (Viewed on March 19, 2018) <>.


Help us elevate the voices of Jewish women.

donate now

The JWA Podcast

listen now

Sign Up for JWA eNews


Discover Education Programs

Join our growing community of educators.

view programs