World War II

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Elinor Guggenheimer

Elinor Guggenheimer focused her career in city government on higher standards for childcare and on greater representation of women in politics.

Peggy Guggenheim

Marguerite “Peggy” Guggenheim amassed one of Italy’s most important modern art collections despite the chaos of WWII.

Tatyana Grosman

Tatyana Grosman helped make American printmaking a respected medium through Universal Limited Art Editions (ULAE), the studio and publishing house she founded in 1957.

Amelia Greenwald

Amelia Greenwald focused her career in public health nursing on training other nurses and creating infrastructure in war-ravaged Europe.

Hetty Goldman

Working in Greece and Turkey despite the chaos of war, Hetty Goldman patiently uncovered subtle clues to daily life in ancient villages.

Tilly Edinger

The daughter of a respected neurologist, Tilly Edinger pioneered the study of paleoneurology through her discovery that brains left detectable imprints on the insides of skulls.

S. Deborah Ebin

The daughter of Mizrachi movement leader Rabbi Aaron M. Ashinsky, S. Deborah Ebin helped the group American Mizrachi Women rescue a staggering number of children from Europe during and after WWII.

Death of Soviet spy Ruth Werner

July 7, 2000

"I fought against fascism.  Whatever else, I can hold my head up high because of that." - Ruth Werner, Soviet spy

Emilie M. Bullowa

As a lawyer and activist, Emilie M. Bullowa devoted her life to justice for the disenfranchised, arguing, “Our democracy doesn’t work if the people who can’t afford … legal aid can’t get justice.”

Alice Goldmark Brandeis

The wife of Supreme Court Justice Louis D. Brandeis, Alice Goldmark Brandeis used her position to advocate for women’s suffrage, workers’ rights, child protection, and Zionist causes.

Meta Pollack Bettman

Meta Pollack Bettman spent her life volunteering for Jewish and civic causes.

Gretel Bergmann

High jumper Gretel Bergmann’s Olympic hopes were dashed when Nazi officials both refused to let her leave Germany and refused to let her compete in the 1936 Games.

Margarete Berent

Margarete Berent fought for acceptance as the first female lawyer to practice in Prussia and began her career again from scratch after fleeing Nazi persecution.

Therese Benedek

Therese Benedek was a pioneer of women’s psychosexual psychology, doing groundbreaking research on the connections between women’s hormones and their emotions.

Dorothy Jacobs Bellanca

Dorothy Jacobs Bellanca made huge strides for worker’s rights as a union leader and through civil service.

Dorothy Walter Baruch

Psychologist Dorothy Walter Baruch championed a psychodynamic approach to child development that focused on the relationship between physical, emotional, and intellectual development and on rechanneling children’s feelings through play and art therapy.

Bertha Badt-Strauss

Bertha Badt-Strauss used her writing to create a broader range of possible identities for women in the cultural Zionist movement called the Jewish Renaissance.

Bea Arthur

Bea Arthur made a career of playing formidable, opinionated women in movies and on television.

Margaret Gene Arnstein

Margaret Gene Arnstein’s belief that nurses should be involved in health policy and research helped transform her profession.

Birdie Amsterdam

Birdie Amsterdam capped a career of firsts in the legal profession with her role as the first woman elected to the New York State Supreme Court.

Celia Adler

Celia Adler won acclaim and success in the Yiddish theater world as a founding member of the Jewish Art Theater.

Barbara Ochs Adler

Barbara Ochs Adler pursued her commitment to Jewish and civic causes through her leadership of organizations ranging from child services to criminal justice and prison reform associations.

Dina Abramowicz

After surviving the Holocaust, Dina Abramowicz reconstituted her rich cultural heritage as the formidable head librarian of the YIVO Institute for Jewish Research.

Simone Veil

Simone Veil fought for women’s rights as a member of the French Parliament, and the 1975 law allowing women the right to an abortion bears her name.

Barbara W. Tuchman

Barbara W. Tuchman won two Pulitzer Prizes for her popular histories The Guns of August and Stilwell and the American Experience in China.
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