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Women's Studies

Ann J. Lane, 1931 - 2013

Born in Brooklyn, Ann Lane completed all of her schooling in New York City. She earned a BA from Brooklyn College in English in 1952, an MA in sociology from New York University in 1958, and a PhD in American History from Columbia University in 1968.

She began her academic career at what was then the women’s college of Rutgers University. In 1971 she moved to John Jay College of Criminal Justice, City University of New York, where she served for 12 years as Professor of History and Chair of the American Studies Program.

Gerda Lerner, 1920 - 2013

Gerda Lerner's life and work so inextricably intertwined, gained prominence thanks to her fearless, continual examination of the world.

"In our culture, and in most patriarchal cultures, we have made an artificial division between thinking and acting, as though the two were mutually exclusive," she said in a 2002 interview with the Wisconsin Academy Review. "The most important thing, the thing I have always lived by, is that you must be engaged in some way in the world in which you live. How, is for each person to choose."

Lynn Gordon, 1946 - 2012

Lynn Gordon, pioneer scholar in women’s history, adamant advocate for women in the academy and in the history profession more specifically, would be pleased to be remembered not just as a dedicated scholar and teacher but as a passionate believer in family, friends, community, “sisterhood,” and the Jewish people. As someone who cared deeply about the world around her, she read everything, attended every possible lecture she could get to.

Amy Swerdlow, 1923 - 2012

Amy Swerdlow was a woman so vibrantly alive that all of us who crossed paths with her find it almost impossible to accept that she is gone.

Launch of the Jewish Women's Archive's Virtual Archive

August 28, 1997

The launch of a Virtual Archive as one of the first major public programs of the Jewish Women's Archive was described in an article in Boston's "Jewish Advocate."

Carol Gilligan publishes "In a Different Voice"

May 24, 1982

Psychologist Carol Gilligan published "In a Different Voice," the first book to argue that women's psychological development could not be understood by studying men.

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How to cite this page

Jewish Women's Archive. "Women's Studies." (Viewed on January 22, 2017) <https://jwa.org/topics/womens-studies>.

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