Voting Rights

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Collection

Ruth Lewinson

Ruth Lewinson, one of the first female Jewish lawyers in America, both worked in private practice and gave public lectures on practical law to help people better navigate the legal system.

Jennie Davidson Levitt

Jennie Davidson Levitt continued her family’s tradition of activism and philanthropy with her work for Jewish organizations, including resettling Jewish refugees during and after WWII.

Adele Lewisohn Lehman

Adele Lewisohn Lehman’s career as a philanthropist and organizational leader spanned both the Jewish community and the secular world.

Sarah Kussy

With seemingly limitless energy, Sarah Kussy helped found and lead a variety of major Jewish organizations like Hadassah, the United Synagogue’s Women’s League, and Young Judea.

Anna Moscowitz Kross

Anna Moscowitz Kross helped reform the New York prison system by curbing abuses and offering felons chances to train in new skills.

Rhoda Kaufman

Rhoda Kaufman helped create social welfare organizations throughout Georgia and overcame prejudice against her religion and gender to become one of the most respected social reformers in the country.

Bertha Beitman Herzog

Bertha Beitman Herzog’s leadership of women’s organizations in Cleveland created a safety net for women and children throughout the region.

Janet Harris

Janet Simons Harris shepherded the National Council of Jewish Women through one of the most divisive times in its history and led both national and international efforts for women’s rights.

Ida Espen Guggenheimer

Ida Espen Guggenheimer supported Zionism, civil rights, and feminism throughout her life, from hosting talks on birth control to supporting political prisoners.

Mary Belle Grossman

Mary Belle Grossman made history in 1918 as one of the first two women admitted to the American Bar Association, then dedicated her career to protecting women.

Death of Carolyn Goodman, not just a Jewish mother

August 17, 2007

“I'm not looking for revenge, but I am looking for justice." - Carolyn Goodman

Ellen, Bonnie, Heather, and Sylvie write home from Freedom Summer

August 12, 1964

“Baby, it takes coming down here to grasp all this no matter how many books we’ve read.”

Naomi Deutsch

A leader in the field of public health nursing, Naomi Deutch spearheaded health and sanitation campaigns in the US, Central America, and the Caribbean.

Frances Allen de Ford

Doctor Frances Allen de Ford pioneered hygiene initiatives in the malaria-ridden, working-class Kensington district of Philadelphia.

Felice Cohn

Felice Cohn was one of Nevada’s first women lawyers and the fourth woman permitted to argue before the US Supreme Court.

Ruth F. Brin

Ruth F. Brin helped transform modern prayer with her evocative writing, translation, and poetry.

Alice Goldmark Brandeis

The wife of Supreme Court Justice Louis D. Brandeis, Alice Goldmark Brandeis used her position to advocate for women’s suffrage, workers’ rights, child protection, and Zionist causes.

Caroline Klein Simon

Caroline Klein Simon fought for gender and racial equality and made the first laws against real estate brokers using “blockbusting” tactics to force sales of homes.

Clara Lemlich Shavelson

Clara Lemlich Shavelson pushed union leaders to recognize the importance of women in the labor movement and organized vital demonstrations for worker’s rights and cost-of-living issues.

Trudy Orris

Shaped by her experiences in post-Holocaust Europe and older than most civil rights volunteers, Trudy Orris brought her children with her to participate in demonstrations down South.

Faith Holsaert

Faith Holsaert was one of the first white women field workers for the civil rights movement in the south, volunteering for voter registration in one of the worst counties in Georgia.

Janice Goodman

Janice Goodman’s work on civil rights issues drove her to become a lawyer, arguing class action cases for women’s rights.

Roberta Galler

Roberta Galler’s work for the Congressional Challenge marked a landmark civil rights effort, using six hundred depositions that blacks had been prevented from voting in the 1964 congressional election as evidence that the election was unconstitutional.

Elaine DeLott Baker

Elaine DeLott Baker’s experiences with civil rights activism led to a career helping workers learn reading and computer skills to qualify for better jobs.

Rose Schneiderman

The first woman elected to national office in a labor union and the only woman on FDR’s National Recovery Administration Labor Advisory Board, Rose Schneiderman transformed the lives of American workers.
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