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Deborah Dash Moore receives the Jewish Cultural Achievement Award

June 10, 2013

"No area offered greater freedom and challenge than American Jewish history… It has been a great voyage.” - Deborah Dash Moore

Harriet Tanzman

Harriet Tanzman has become a chronicler of the civil rights movement, creating new entry points into civil rights history.

Debra L. Schultz

Debra Schultz served as an advisor to the Jewish Women’s Archive in creating the Living the Legacy curriculum based on research she had done on the history of Jewish women in the civil rights movement.

Faith Holsaert

Faith Holsaert was one of the first white women field workers for the civil rights movement in the south, volunteering for voter registration in one of the worst counties in Georgia.

Elizabeth Slade Hirschfeld

Elizabeth Slade Hirschfeld’s search for a way to make a difference led her first to become a Freedom Rider and then a public school teacher.

Janice Goodman

Janice Goodman’s work on civil rights issues drove her to become a lawyer, arguing class action cases for women’s rights.

Miriam Cohen Glickman

One of the first white women to do field work for the civil rights movement in the South, Miriam Cohen Glickman was assumed to be black by the locals, who called her “bright,” a word for light-skinned African Americans.

Elaine DeLott Baker

Elaine DeLott Baker’s experiences with civil rights activism led to a career helping workers learn reading and computer skills to qualify for better jobs.

Bernice Sains Freid

Bernice Sains Freid called her time in WAVES (Women Accepted for Volunteer Emergency Service) during WWII “the happiest days of my life.”

Alice Lillie Seligsberg

Alice Lillie Seligsberg dedicated her life to caring for orphans, first in America and then in Israel.

Muriel Rukeyser

Muriel Rukeyer’s poetry reflected her passionate activism and her belief in confronting the truth of her lived experience.

Gladys Rosen

Gladys Rosen created resources for educators and the wider community that changed how people approached Jewish history and culture.

Betty Robbins

Betty Robbins spent her life breaking gender boundaries in the Jewish community even before she made history as the first woman cantor in 1955.

Nacha Rivkin

Nacha Rivkin transformed education for Orthodox girls by utilizing new models of education at the girls’ yeshiva she helped found.

Adrienne Rich

Adrienne Cecile Rich used her poetry as a means to reclaim the voices of the silenced, drawing from her own experience as a woman and lesbian.

Mary Goldsmith Prag

The mother of the first Jewish congresswoman, Mary Goldsmith Prag was a literal pioneer in her own right as a gold-rush era teacher and the first Jewish member of the San Francisco Board of Education.

Grace Paley

A rare example of a writer deeply engaged with the world, Grace Paley made an impact as much through her activism as her writing.

Louise Nevelson

Louise Nevelson transformed the concept of sculpture from an object the audience walks around to a space the audience can enter into.

Belle Moskowitz

Belle Moskowitz gained considerable power and influence as New York Governor Alfred E. Smith’s closest advisor by offering him her complete loyalty and support through his gubernatorial work and his 1928 presidential campaign.

Judith Malina

Judith Malina won acclaim as an actress, a director and a producer through the experimental Living Theatre she cofounded with her husband, Julian Beck, in 1948.

Sadie Loewith

Sadie Loewith was thirty years old before she was allowed to vote, but took on leadership roles in business and local government and fought to ensure other women could do the same.

Deborah Lipstadt

Deborah Lipstadt stuck a major blow against Holocaust deniers when she won her landmark libel case against David Irving.

Tehilla Lichtenstein

Lichtenstein cofounded Jewish Science with her husband as an alternative to Christian Science, creating a small but passionate following and carving a place for herself as a congregational leader.

Rosina Lhévinne

Rosina Lhévinne preferred to keep her husband in the limelight, but her talents as a pianist and a teacher of some of the most famous musicians of her time made her noteworthy in her own right.

Rita Levi-Montalcini

Rita Levi-Montalcini won the Nobel Prize for her work in discovering nerve growth factor, crucial for understanding neurodegenerative disorders like ALS, Parkinson’s, and Alzheimer’s.
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