Teachers

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Vivian Gornick

Vivian Gornick chronicled her own feminist awakening and that of the country through both her journalism for the Village Voice and her powerful memoirs.

Rose Goldstein

Rose Goldstein worked to support women’s greater involvement in Jewish ritual life through her education work with United Synagogue and her essential guide to Jewish prayer, A Time to Pray: A Personal Approach to the Jewish Prayer Book.

Rebecca Fischel Goldstein

Both as a rabbi’s wife and as a leader in her own right, Rebecca Fischel Goldstein strove to make women a significant force in Orthodox Judaism.

Luba Robin Goldsmith

A respected doctor and teacher of medicine, Luba Robin Goldsmith created a supportive environment for women who followed her into medicine.

Josephine Clara Goldmark

Josephine Goldmark laid the groundwork for transforming American labor laws by amassing data that forced lawmakers to confront the painful realities of factory work.

Hetty Goldman

Working in Greece and Turkey despite the chaos of war, Hetty Goldman patiently uncovered subtle clues to daily life in ancient villages.

Gertrude Scharff Goldhaber

During a career limited time and again by her gender, her religion, and her marital status, physicist Gertrude Scharff Goldhaber helped ensure other women scientists would not face the same hurdles.

Tilly Edinger

The daughter of a respected neurologist, Tilly Edinger pioneered the study of paleoneurology through her discovery that brains left detectable imprints on the insides of skulls.

Lily Edelman

Lily Edelman made great contributions to multiculturalism and Jewish education through her writing and teaching.

Celia Dropkin

Celia Dropkin defied both social and artistic conventions with her sensual, free-verse, Yiddish poetry.

Death of prima ballerina Melissa Hayden

August 9, 2006

“Blunt honesty and generosity in [Melissa Hayden's] life and dancing, that was her name.”

Florence Dolowitz

Florence Dolowitz both cofounded the Women’s American ORT (Organization for Rehabilitation and Training) and helped lead the organization for decades.

Dorothy Dinnerstein

Dorothy Dinnerstein earned her place as a major feminist thinker with her groundbreaking 1976 book The Mermaid and the Minotaur: Sexual Arrangements and Human Malaise.

Naomi Deutsch

A leader in the field of public health nursing, Naomi Deutch spearheaded health and sanitation campaigns in the US, Central America, and the Caribbean.

Florence Levin Denmark

Florence Levin Denmark helped found the field of women’s psychology and built crucial support for it in academic circles.

Katya Delakova

Katya Delakova was a pioneer of Jewish dance, blending folk traditions, Hasidic worship, modern dance, and improvisation.

Vera Dean

A scholar of international relations, Vera Dean helped shape American foreign policy through her writing.

Lucy S. Dawidowicz

Lucy S. Dawidowicz believed that her passion for the shtetls she had known and her experiences working with Holocaust survivors in postwar Germany made her a better historian.

Natalie Zemon Davis

Through her investigation of court records, pamphlets, and other nontraditional sources, historian Natalie Zemon Davis created vivid pictures of the lives of ordinary people in medieval and renaissance France, particularly in her wildly popular 1983 book, The Return of Martin Guerre.

Annette Daum

Annette Daum combined interfaith dialogue and feminism in the hopes of both defusing anti-Semitism in the feminist movement and finding solutions to the common problems facing women in different faiths.

Rose Laub Coser

Sociologist Rose Laub Coser redefined major concepts in role theory—the idea that our actions are largely dictated by our roles in society—and applied them to expectations of women’s roles in the family and the workplace.

Jo Copeland

Starting her career at a time when American fashion slavishly copied Paris designs, Jo Copeland created glamorous outfits that were uniquely American.

Claribel Cone

Claribel Cone made contributions to two vastly different fields as a biologist and a patron of modern French art.

Mildred Cohn

Biochemist Mildred Cohn used new technology to measure organic reactions in living cells.

Rose Gollup Cohen

Through her moving 1918 autobiography, Out of the Shadow, Rose Gollup Cohen offered a vivid account of her life as an immigrant Jewish woman in the sweatshops of New York.
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