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Sports

Gretel Bergmann

High jumper Gretel Bergmann’s Olympic hopes were dashed when Nazi officials both refused to let her leave Germany and refused to let her compete in the 1936 Games.

Amy Alcott

Amy Alcott dedicated her life to the game of golf and spent years chasing one last, elusive win before finally making it into the World Golf Hall of Fame.

Muriel Rukeyser

Muriel Rukeyer’s poetry reflected her passionate activism and her belief in confronting the truth of her lived experience.

Nancy Lieberman

Hailed as one of the greats of women’s basketball, Nancy Lieberman set a record as the youngest Olympic medalist in basketball and was inducted into multiple sports halls of fame.

Gladys Heldman

Gladys Heldman fought to ensure that women’s tennis was taken seriously and that women players competed for the same prize money as men.

Lillian Copeland

Lillian Copeland was the epitome of a strong woman with a remarkable career, first as a record-setting Olympic medalist and later as an officer in the Los Angeles Sheriff’s Department.

Senda Berenson

Drawn to sports by her recovery from childhood illness, Senda Berenson became known as the “Mother of Women’s Basketball.”

Bobbie Rosenfeld

Bobbie Rosenfeld wasn’t just an Olympic medalist, she was quite possibly the most versatile athlete of all time.

Landing the Triple: Female, Israeli, and First

Anya Davidovich, a sixteen-year old girl born in the USA, will be skating for Israel in the Winter Olympics. Her parents are Israeli, and most of her family lives in Israel. She is part of the first-ever pairs team to compete for Israel in the Olympics and the only female member of Team Israel. Anya will be carrying the flag for the Israeli delegation.

Paula Sinclair, JWA Director of Programs & Partnerships, interviewed Anya and her mother as they prepared for their trip to Sochi.

Feminist-Fandom

As the Red Sox went along, up and up the ladder to win the World Series, I noticed some posts from my leftist friends living in Boston. They were commenting on the perceived chauvinism of sports fans, mostly drunk men on the Green Line, who had rubbed them the wrong way.

It got me to thinking about my firm feminism ideals and my Sox fandom—are the two things directly contradictory? Is there something about being a sports fan that makes me less of an activist for justice?

Editor's Note: Feminist-Fandom was originally published on Always a Squeaky Wheel on November 27th.

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How to cite this page

Jewish Women's Archive. "Sports." (Viewed on June 25, 2018) <https://jwa.org/topics/sports>.

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