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Schools

Soloveitchik, Rabbi Joseph Dov

Rabbi Joseph Dov Soloveitchik (1903–1993) was the undisputed rabbinic leader and leading ideologue of American Modern Orthodoxy for much of the twentieth century.

Chava Slucka-Kesten

As a writer from the perspective of a politically engaged woman, Slucka-Kesten offers a unique glimpse into pre- and post-war Jewish life in Poland’s cities and villages, as well as into the early years of the State of Israel; there are few such women’s voices.

Ida Siegel

One of the most indefatigable and effective volunteer leaders in the history of the Toronto Jewish community, Ida Siegel either herself founded or participated in the establishment of many of the community’s most significant Zionist and welfare institutions.

Chana Shpitzer

Although not well-known outside Jerusalem, Chana Shpitzer was an important figure in the history of Israeli education and a pioneer in the field of Jewish education for girls.

Alice Hildegard Shalvi

Well known as a public speaker and a social activist, Alice Hildegard Shalvi’s contribution to Jewish education, to Israeli culture and to Jewish feminism has been widely recognized.

Second Aliyah: Women's Experience and Their Role in the Yishuv

The question of women’s identity in Jewish society in general and Yishuv society in particular has attracted some scholarly attention. The majority of the studies offer an approach that depicts the adoption of masculine characteristics by the new Hebrew woman and the excessive admiration for masculine labor as opposed to feminine labor.

Miriam Finn Scott

Miriam Finn Scott, a child diagnostician and specialist in parent education, advocated that “the soil of a child’s life was his home” and that parents could ensure the proper growth of their children if only they transformed their homes into “gardens.” Scott’s belief that good parenting was not instinctual fueled her desire to provide advice to parents in child rearing.

Eugenie Schwarzwald

Eugenie Schwarzwald, an ambitious progressive educator of small and heavy stature, dressed in a reform-dress, with a becoming short haircut and a charming shy smile, imprinted her charismatic personality on the education, social work, and literary heritage of Vienna during the first half of the twentieth century.

Margarethe Meyer Schurz

In the fall of 1856, Margarethe Schurz opened the first kindergarten in the United States in her living room for her daughter, Agatha, and four young cousins. She soon moved her German-speaking kindergarten to the center of Watertown, Wisconsin, so that more children could conveniently attend.

Adeline Schulberg

Adeline Schulberg’s long and winding career path led her from socialist activist, to child welfare advocate, to Hollywood agent. During World War II, she moved to London and returned to activist work, helping rescue refugees from Nazi Europe.

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How to cite this page

Jewish Women's Archive. "Schools." (Viewed on March 24, 2019) <https://jwa.org/topics/schools>.

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