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Reproductive Rights

Battling Bella for Introverts

“Women have been trained to speak softly and carry a lipstick. Those days are over.” —Bella Abzug

Bella Abzug held office in the House of Representatives some forty years ago, and since then, what she said has been proven: those days are over. Women aren’t being trained to speak softly anymore, at least not uniformly. Outspoken women are allowed to put themselves out there.

Laurie Schwab Zabin

Laurie Schwab Zabin's interest in reproductive health began in a volunteer capacity and then led to a distinguished professional career at the Johns Hopkins School of Public Health.

Dr. Ruth Finkelstein

A beloved doctor for generations of Baltimore women, Dr. Ruth Finkelstein promoted women's health and reproductive rights over a career that spanned half a century.

Senator Rosalie Silber Abrams

The first Jewish woman elected to the Maryland State Senate, Rosalie Silber Abrams was an energetic and activist legislator who oversaw the passage of nearly 300 bills during her seventeen-year career in the Maryland General Assembly.

Gloria Steinem

Gloria Steinem is one of the most influential writers, lecturers, editors, and activists of our time. She travels worldwide as a lecturer and feminist organizer, and is a frequent media spokeswoman on issues of equality.

Barbara Seaman

In 1960, Barbara Seaman introduced a new style of health reporting that centered on the patient. She was first to reveal that women lacked the information to make informed decisions on contraception, childbirth, even breast-feeding.

Nancy Miriam Hawley

Nancy Miriam Hawley is a founder of the Boston Women's Health Book Collective, Inc., the organization responsible for writing the best seller Our Bodies, Ourselves (New York: Simon and Schuster, 1972; translated into 18 languages), a book that shifted the national and international dialogue about women's health, sexuality, and power.

Heather Booth

Heather Booth has been building and consulting with large-scale volunteer efforts for 40 years. In 1963, at Yad Vashem in Israel, she made a commitment that in the face of injustice, she would work for justice/tikkun olam.

Joyce Antler

Joyce Antler is the Samuel Lane Professor of American Jewish History and Culture at Brandeis University, where she teaches in the American Studies Department. She is the author of The Journey Home: How Jewish Women Shaped Modern America and the editor of America and I: Short Stories by American Jewish Women Writers and Talking Back: Images of Jewish Women in American Popular Culture.

My North Carolina Abortion

When I first began writing this piece, I wanted to explain why I got an abortion. But then I remembered it’s no one else’s business. And that’s what’s missing from the conversation in North Carolina. I don’t think its a bad thing for all health clinics to uphold a certain level of standards, both in hygiene and practice; in fact I want that to be the case for any place where I or my loved ones receive medical care. But it IS a bad thing to attempt to limit my right, or the right of any other woman, to make decisions about their body and pass it off as “protection”.

Pages

How to cite this page

Jewish Women's Archive. "Reproductive Rights." (Viewed on December 15, 2017) <https://jwa.org/topics/reproductive-rights>.

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