Philanthropy

Content type
Collection

Adele Bloch-Bauer

A wealthy socialite and salon hostess in her day, Adele Bloch-Bauer became the center of an historic legal case when her niece demanded the return of her portrait, stolen by the Nazis.

Anne Heyman

Inspired by the youth villages that allowed Israel to welcome staggering numbers of orphans after the Holocaust, Anne Heyman created the Agahozo-Shalom Youth Village to shelter orphans of the Rwandan genocide.

Fanny Baronin Von Arnstein

Franziska “Fanny” von Arnstein, who rose to the rank of baroness, navigated the artistic and political upheaval of the Napoleonic Era as a hostess of salons which welcomed celebrities ranging from Horatio Nelson to Schopenhauer.

Gussie Edelman Wyner

Blending a businesswoman’s craft with an activist’s passion, Gussie Edelman Wyner created life memberships for Hadassah and other nonprofit organizations as a way to raise funds and cement commitment.

Frieda Schiff Warburg

Frieda Schiff Warburg’s determination to carry on her father’s philanthropic traditions led her to support and shape major Jewish institutions in America and Israel.

Doris May Ulmann

Trained to think of photography as an art form on par with painting, Doris May Ulmann captured both the celebrities of her day and the rural poor of Appalachia with what the New York Times described as “haunting power.”

Edith Rosewald Stern

Edith Rosenwald Stern didn’t just commit herself to civil rights causes, she encouraged others to contribute by creating challenge grants to match donations.

Death of Susan Braun, dance archivist

October 3, 1995
Artist Susan Braun made an about-face in her career in the art world and began to fill the need of documenting dance on film.

Death of Estelle Joan Sommers, “Empress of Dance”

March 21, 1994
"I have always cherished my family, Israel and dance." - Estelle Joan Sommers

Idina Menzel

A longtime star of the Broadway stage, Idina Menzel became the first person ever to claim both a Billboard Top 10 slot (for Holiday Wishes in 2014) and a Tony Award (for Wicked in 2003).

Patricia Arquette

Patricia Arquette has navigated a career path from Hollywood to television and back again, culminating in a landslide of awards for her supporting role in 2014’s Boyhood.

Irene Mayer Selznick

The daughter of Hollywood magnate Louis B. Mayer, Irene Mayer Selznick went on to help her husband, David O. Selznick, run his movie production company before becoming a theater producer in her own right.

Rebecca Schweitzer

Rebecca Schweitzer’s generosity helped underwrite early, important projects throughout Palestine and inspired others to give what they could.

Therese Loeb Schiff

Therese Loeb Schiff used her wealth to address a wide range of needs in the Jewish community, from organizing a literary series for the wealthy to stopping sex trafficking of young immigrant women.

Regina Spektor

With her surreal lyrics and experimental vocalizations, Regina Spektor carved a place for herself in the anti-folk music scene and went on to conquer the pop charts.

Rebecca Machado Phillips

Beyond mothering her many biological and adopted children, Rebecca Machado Phillips tended her community by founding soup kitchens and aid societies for the poor and sick.

Ellen Phillips

Ellen Phillips helped shape generations of Jewish children as a founder of the Hebrew Sunday School Society, the first to offer lessons on Jewish religion and culture in English to both boys and girls.

Amy Pascal

Amy Pascal has regularly been named one of the world’s most powerful women by Forbes and the Hollywood Reporter for her management of Sony Pictures’ run of commercial and critical successes from Casino Royale to The Social Network.

Mollie Parnis

Mollie Parnis was equally famed for her New York salons that welcomed literary and political giants and for her fashion designs that adorned first ladies.

Estelle Newman

Estelle Reiss Newman innovated new programs for aiding the blind, from providing retirement homes for the aged blind to helping younger disabled people navigate independent lives in their communities.

Lucy Goldschmidt Moses

A lifelong New Yorker, Lucy Goldschmidt Moses used her wealth to improve the city she loved, from restoring Central Park’s iconic Bow Bridge to funding the city’s hospitals and medical schools.

Elsie Margaret Binger Naumburg

Elsie Margaret Binger Naumburg put her research into rare South American birds on hold during WWII to aid a different breed of songbird: refugee and unemployed musicians.

Linda Rosenberg Miller

Unsatisfied with the traditional pursuits of married women of her day, Linda Rosenberg Miller devoted herself to Jewish studies and collecting art and archeological treasures.

Ellen Lehman Mccluskey

Interior design maven Ellen Lehman McCluskey shaped the look and feel of some of the world’s most luxurious hotels and businesses, including the Plaza, the Waldorf–Astoria, and Regency hotels.

Irma May

During the economic devastation of the 1920s, Irma May reported on anti–Semitism throughout Eastern Europe and raised massive funds to help Jews overseas.
Subscribe to Philanthropy

Donate

Help us elevate the voices of Jewish women.

donate now

The JWA Podcast

Can We Talk?

listen now

Get JWA in your inbox