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Philanthropy and Volunteerism

Sandra Brown

A tireless leader of the Toronto Jewish community, Sandra Brown dedicated her volunteering career to improving Jewish schools.

Adele Bloch-Bauer

A wealthy socialite and salon hostess in her day, Adele Bloch-Bauer became the center of an historic legal case when her niece demanded the return of her portrait, stolen by the Nazis.

Anne Heyman

Inspired by the youth villages that allowed Israel to welcome staggering numbers of orphans after the Holocaust, Anne Heyman created the Agahozo-Shalom Youth Village to shelter orphans of the Rwandan genocide.

Fanny Baronin Von Arnstein

Franziska “Fanny” von Arnstein, who rose to the rank of baroness, navigated the artistic and political upheaval of the Napoleonic Era as a hostess of salons which welcomed celebrities ranging from Horatio Nelson to Schopenhauer.

Gussie Edelman Wyner

Blending a businesswoman’s craft with an activist’s passion, Gussie Edelman Wyner created life memberships for Hadassah and other nonprofit organizations as a way to raise funds and cement commitment.

Louise Waterman Wise

Louise Waterman Wise spent her career caring for Jewish refugees and lost souls of all kinds, from American orphans to Holocaust survivors.

Pearl Willen

Pearl Willen’s term as president of the National Council of Jewish Women from 1963–1967 capped a long career of community organizing from the local to the international level.

Frieda Schiff Warburg

Frieda Schiff Warburg’s determination to carry on her father’s philanthropic traditions led her to support and shape major Jewish institutions in America and Israel.

Doris May Ulmann

Trained to think of photography as an art form on par with painting, Doris May Ulmann captured both the celebrities of her day and the rural poor of Appalachia with what the New York Times described as “haunting power.”

Edith Rosewald Stern

Edith Rosenwald Stern didn’t just commit herself to civil rights causes, she encouraged others to contribute by creating challenge grants to match donations.

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How to cite this page

Jewish Women's Archive. "Philanthropy and Volunteerism." (Viewed on December 18, 2017) <https://jwa.org/topics/philanthropy-and-volunteerism>.

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