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Passover

Eating Jewish: Quajado for Passover

Passover cooking is certainly defined by the dietary restriction of abstaining from chametz, or leavened grain.

Breaking free from tradition: New ideas for Passover learning

Watch The Prince of Egypt. Throw the toy frogs. Have a chocolate seder. Create artistic interpretations of the Ten Plagues.

Include women's voices with JWA's Passover Haggadah

Last week Kathleen Peratis shared her disappointment with the widely acclaimed The New American Haggadah by Jonathan Safran Foer and Nathan Englander:

The orange on the seder plate and Miriam's Cup: Foregrounding women at your seder

Just before we drink the second cup of wine in the Passover seder, we speak of three symbols considered indispensible to the holiday's meaning: the shank bone, the matzah, and the bitter herbs.

Esther M. Broner, 1930 - 2011

She was our spiritual leader. She made room for us at the table by creating a whole new one—a Seder table at which women’s voices were heard. She encouraged us to ask the Four Questions of Women and to recite women’s plagues, of which there were always more than 10.

We remember Esther M. Broner

We were saddened to wake up to the news that Esther M. Broner passed away yesterday. A beloved novelist, playwright, ritualist, and feminist writer, Esther M. Broner was born on July 8, 1927, in Detroit, Michigan. Her writing, including Her Mothers (1975), A Weave of Women (1978) and many others, made her one of the most important teachers of Jewish feminism and feminist Judaism.

I get by with a little help from my online friends

Two months ago, I moved to a new town 700 miles from home.

Eating Jewish: Mufleta - Breaking Passover the Moroccan way

The way in which people choose to break Passover varies enormously and that first taste of chametz can be the non-traditional, but ever popular sushi, or something more rooted in Jewish culinary history like bagels. However, the Moroccan Jewish community ends Passover with a distinctive celebration known as the Mimouna.

Matzah Toffee Bark

So you've spent a week eating matzah with anything you can think of (I have personally eaten it so far with various nut butters, tuna salad, charoset, and jam).

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How to cite this page

Jewish Women's Archive. "Passover." (Viewed on December 12, 2017) <https://jwa.org/topics/passover>.

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