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Organizations and Institutions

Sadie Loewith

“Politics makes strange bedfellows,” the adage states. Those “bedfellows” were joined by a feisty, strong, opinionated woman in Bridgeport, Connecticut, in the 1920s. She was Sadie Loewith, teacher, businesswoman, active Republican Party worker, chairperson, organizer, and politician of high repute. Her interests were many and varied, and her ability to lead and to elicit respect was unwavering.

Johanna Loeb

Johanna Unna was born in Rendsburg, Schleswig-Holstein, Germany, on May 25, 1844. In her early years, she was educated in Europe. She immigrated with her family to the United States in 1856 and eventually settled in Chicago, where she continued her basic education. She married Moritz Loeb, who emigrated from Bechtheim, Germany, and who died on April 10, 1892, at age fifty-two. They had four sons, Jacob M, Albert H., Julius, and Sidney. All of them were prominent in business and continued the family legacy of civic and communal service. Jacob was president of the Chicago Hebrew Institute, the predecessor of the Jewish Community Centers of Chicago, from 1912 to 1932, and was a board member and president for the Chicago Board of Education. Albert was the general manager of Sears, Roebuck and Company. Julius became vice president of George Kraft Company. Sidney was a successful real estate broker.

Alice Springer Fleisher Liveright

A woman from an affluent background who devoted her life to the underprivileged, Alice Springer Fleisher Liveright was part of a new generation of female professionals who helped to transform reform work from a pastime for middle-class women into a livelihood. This sense of professionalism, combined with left-leaning ideals of social justice and an outspoken manner, led her to work for equal rights for women and African Americans, and social welfare for children and poor adults.

Charlotte Lipsky

Charlotte Schacht Lipsky, interior decorator, was born in Riga, Latvia, in December 1879. The eldest of five children, she was the only girl. Lipsky immigrated to the United States in 1895, accompanied by her mother, who lived with Lipsky until her death. Upon arriving in the United States, Lipsky immediately involved herself in politics, specifically in the Jewish socialist movement, becoming one of “Emma Goldman’s girls” on the Lower East Side of New York.

Irma Levy Lindheim

Irma Levy Lindheim was a colorful American Zionist millionaire, fund-raiser, and educator. Born in New York City on December 9, 1886, into a German Jewish assimilated family with roots dating back several generations in the American South, Lindheim discovered Zionism at age twenty-one. In 1926, she succeeded Henrietta Szold as president of Hadassah, the Women’s Zionist Organization of America. Then, in 1933, as a forty-seven-year-old widow and mother of five, Lindheim joined [jwa_encyclopedia_glossary:342]Kibbutz[/jwa_encyclopedia_glossary] Mishmar ha-Emek in Israel, where she remained, aside from frequent stays in the United States and elsewhere for Zionist and political activity. To create greater interest in Judaism and Zionism, she designed family-based educational programs, a project on which she worked until her death.

Ruth Lewinson

Ruth Lewinson, one of the earliest female Jewish lawyers in the United States, was born to Benno and Fanny (Berliner) Lewinson in New York City on July 1, 1895. She received her B.A. degree, graduating Phi Beta Kappa, from Hunter College in 1916, and a law degree from New York University in 1919. She then taught English to immigrants and gave lectures on practical law. In 1920, she was admitted to the New York bar and became a senior member of the firm established by her father. She worked with him until 1953, when she started her own private practice.

Florence Nightingale Levy

Florence Nightingale Levy’s most significant achievement was the founding of the American Art Annual in 1898. A comprehensive directory of the American art world, the Annual catalogued schools, associations, exhibitions, and artists nationwide. Levy went on to perform invaluable editing, organizing, and educational roles in the American art world for the next fifty years.

Adele Rosenwald Levy

Adele Rosenwald Levy used her affluence to promote public-spirited philanthropy and Jewish causes. Active in thirty-five charitable, artistic, and community organizations, Levy never failed her father’s principle that those of good fortune should assume “the obligations that come with wealth.”

Jennie Davidson Levitt

Jennie Davidson Levitt represented the “finest synthesis of Americanism and Judaism,” according to the leaders of the Minneapolis Jewish National Fund at a 1968 dinner in her honor. Deeply aware of her responsibilities as a financially secure Jewish woman, Levitt labored to improve social conditions for diverse groups in the United States and abroad. Her broad approach to social reform, and the particular issues that she addressed, paralleled the changing concerns of the National Council of Jewish Women (NCJW), her most beloved organization for more than fifty years.

Jacqueline Levine

Jacqueline Levine is an outstanding example of female activist leadership in American Jewish life. In over five decades of service to the Jewish community, she has combined her powerfully deep liberal political beliefs and activities, which benefit the poor and disadvantaged, with her concern for the vast needs of specific Jewish communities.

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Jewish Women's Archive. "Organizations and Institutions." (Viewed on July 25, 2017) <https://jwa.org/topics/organizations-and-institutions>.

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