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Organizations and Institutions

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Jessica Cohen

Jessie Cohen served as editor of the Jewish Review and Observer for most of her life, maintaining an important resource for Jews in the city of Cleveland.

Audrey Cohen

Audrey Cohen founded both a college and an organization to create paraprofessional jobs based on her belief that learning is a lifelong activity and that students learn best when they can apply their knowledge in the world.

Helen Lehman Buttenwieser

As a lawyer, Helen Lehman Buttenwieser fought to protect children in the foster care system.

Ruth F. Brin

Ruth F. Brin helped transform modern prayer with her evocative writing, translation, and poetry.

Fanny Fligelman Brin

Fanny Fligelman Brin used her position as president of the National Council of Jewish Women to mobilize support for international peace efforts throughout the 1930s and 1940s.

Rose Brenner

As president of the National Council of Jewish Women, Rose Brenner focused on inclusion of people who were often marginalized—the deaf, the blind, and those isolated in rural areas.

Susan Braun

Susan Braun preserved what were thought to be inherently fleeting experiences when, in 1956, she founded Dance Films Association to support, promote, and archive films of dance performances.

Anna Pavitt Boudin

Anna Pavitt Boudin defied expectations throughout her career, both as one of the first women dentists in America and as the founder and president of the Women’s American ORT, one of the largest Jewish women’s organizations in America.

Madeline Borg

Madeline Borg dedicated her career to giving children second chances—through studying juvenile delinquency, working with child welfare and probation associations, and by founding the Big Sister movement.

Florence Meyer Blumenthal

Florence Meyer Blumenthal created an arts foundation that funded hundreds of promising artists and allowed them to focus on pursuing their craft.

Henrietta Blaustein

Through her generosity, Henrietta Blaustein created and sustained a foundation, a hospital’s maternity center, and dozens of other charitable initiatives and organizations.

Meta Pollack Bettman

Meta Pollack Bettman spent her life volunteering for Jewish and civic causes.

Rebecca Thurman Bernstein

Rebecca Thurman Bernstein was lauded by local and national organizations for her efforts to improve health care, literacy, and Jewish life in Portland, Maine.

Dorothy Lehman Bernhard

Dorothy Lehman Bernhard made great contributions to the causes that were dearest to her, including child welfare, the arts, and the Jewish community, both by overseeing more than thirty organizations and, more directly, by becoming a foster parent.

Margarete Berent

Margarete Berent fought for acceptance as the first female lawyer to practice in Prussia and began her career again from scratch after fleeing Nazi persecution.

Rose I. Bender

Rose I. Bender’s work as a Zionist leader reached its high point when she became the first female executive director of the Zionist Organization of Philadelphia in 1945.

Marion Eugénie Bauer

A modernist composer who experimented with dissonance, serialism, and complex harmonies, Marion Eugénie Bauer also made strides for women through her musical scholarship that revived interest in female composers.

Lizzie Spiegel Barbe

A cousin of Hannah Greenebaum Solomon, Lizzie Spiegel Barbe volunteered her energies to the National Council of Jewish Women and a variety of other causes in the Chicago area.

Belle Baker

Torch singer Belle Baker’s resonant voice made her the first choice of many composers to debut their songs, introducing 163 songs to the public over the course of her career on stage and in recordings.

Edith Jacobi Baerwald

Edith Jacobi Baerwald devoted her energy to philanthropic organizations, but also loved connecting directly with the people she helped through her volunteer work at settlement houses.

Dora Askowith

Dora Askowith tried to galvanize Jewish students into social activism and leadership by teaching them the history of their faith.

Jeannette Arons

Jeannette Arons served in a variety of roles with the National Council of Jewish Women, from helping juvenile offenders rebuild their lives to helping Jewish immigrants become citizens.

Sadie American

Forceful, dedicated, and brash, Sadie American shaped the National Council of Jewish Women for more than twenty years before resigning and severing all ties with the organization.

Miriam Albert

Miriam Albert helped B’nai B’rith Women transition from an auxiliary of the men’s association to an independent organization.

Racie Adler

Racie Friedenwald Adler helped shape a number of Jewish institutions, most significantly the Women’s League For Conservative Judaism.
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