Organizations and Institutions

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Aly Raisman

Alexandra “Aly” Raisman not only won gold and bronze medals for her individual performances at the 2012 Olympics but captained the women’s gymnastic team that won the gold medal that year.

Jeanne Greenberg Rohatyn

Jeanne Greenberg Rohatyn has helped shape the art world both directly as curator of three art galleries and indirectly as the host of salons where artists of all stripes have met and begun surprising collaborations.

Jaclyn Friedman

Jaclyn Friedman voiced new possibilities for sex-positive feminism and a rejection of rape culture as editor of Yes Means Yes: Visions of Female Sexual Power and a World Without Rape.

Sara Landau

Highly unusual for her time, Sara Landau not only made a name for herself as a respected economist, but paired her scholarship with inexhaustible volunteerism both in her community and through national organizations.

Sarah Kussy

With seemingly limitless energy, Sarah Kussy helped found and lead a variety of major Jewish organizations like Hadassah, the United Synagogue’s Women’s League, and Young Judea.

Matilda Steinam Kubie

Matilda Steinam Kubie helped various charitable organizations extend their reach through her leadership and her savvy use of advertising.

Lillian Kasindorf Kavey

Lillian Kasondorf Kavey helped immigrants escape Eastern Europe by cutting the red tape that prevented their relatives from saving enough money to bring them to America.

Rhoda Kaufman

Rhoda Kaufman helped create social welfare organizations throughout Georgia and overcame prejudice against her religion and gender to become one of the most respected social reformers in the country.

Rose Kaplan

Despite her own failing health, Rose Kaplan insisted on nursing Jewish settlers in Palestine and refugees in Egypt and inspired others to follow her example.

Regina Kaplan

Regina “Kappy” Kaplan helped break down gender barriers in medicine by creating the first nursing school in the South that admitted male students.

Mordecai Kaplan

The founder of Reconstructionist Judaism, Mordecai Kaplan struck a fundamental blow for women’s participation in Jewish ritual with the bat mitzvah of his eldest daughter, Judith.

Anna Kaplan

Anna Kaplan helped transform nursing in Israel by holding it to the best standards of medical care from around the world.

Aline Kaplan

As executive director of Hadassah, Aline Kaplan credited the organization’s success to the commitment of its volunteers, whose numbers grew to a staggering 370,000 during her tenure.

Geri M. Joseph

Geri M. Joseph distinguished herself both as a journalist covering vital stories and as US ambassador to the Netherlands during a diplomatic crisis.

Lydia Joel

Lydia Joel began her dance career as a performer, but it was as the editor of Dance Magazine that she had the greatest impact on the field.

Laura Margolis Jarblum

Laura Margolis Jarblum’s deft management of wartime social services on three different continents for the Joint Distribution Committee saved the lives of thousands.

Marie Jahoda

Marie Jahoda was a major figure in psychology for her work on the effects of unemployment on emotional well-being as well as the social impact of McCarthy-era blacklisting.

Janie Jacobson

Janie Jacobson’s love of Jewish tradition led her to create biblical children’s plays that were performed nationwide.

Anna Jacobson

Anna Jacobson fought to continue teaching German language and literature at Hunter College throughout the 1930s and 1940s, at a time when many schools suppressed all things German.

Rose Gell Jacobs

Rose Gell Jacobs led Hadassah through the early days of WWII, overseeing the organization’s shift from creating medical services in Palestine to rescuing thousands of Jews from war-torn Europe.

Rose Gell Jacobs

Rose Gell Jacobs led Hadassah through the early days of WWII, overseeing the organization’s shift from creating medical services in Palestine to rescuing thousands of Jews from war-torn Europe.

Blanche Frank Ittleson

Blanche Frank Ittleson’s pioneering work in treating and teaching mentally challenged and emotionally disturbed children opened new possibilities for struggling children and their families.

Edith Somborn Isaacs

Edith Somborn Isaacs made an impact on New York City both through her own volunteerism and by successfully running her husband’s campaigns for public office.

Ida Henrietta Hyde

While Ida Henrietta Hyde was best known for creating a microelectrode that could sample and manipulate individual cells, she was proudest of her work to support other women scientists.

Fannie Hurst

One of the highest-paid American writers of her time, Fannie Hurst explored the challenges facing Jews and other minorities.
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