Non-Fiction

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Collection

Ruth Hagy Brod

Ruth Hagy Brod’s varied career as a journalist, documentary filmmaker and literary agent made her the ideal publicity director for Job Orientation In the Neighborhoods, helping high school dropouts train for careers.

Judy Blume

Judy Blume’s books, known for their humor and their honest portrayal of the pains of adolescence, have shaped generations of young girls.

Hannah Arendt

Hannah Arendt grappled with the Holocaust throughout her lifetime, creating the concept of “the banality of evil” to understand the widespread complicity in the mass killings.

Mary Antin

An immigrant girl who achieved literary fame at the age of thirteen, Mary Antin became a symbol of the American dream.

Grace Aguilar

In her short life, Grace Aguilar wrote twice as many books as Jane Austen, from popular historical romances to an introduction to Judaism that was used by both churches and synagogues.

Stella Adler

As an actress and a teacher, Stella Adler transformed a generation of American actors though her understanding of Method acting.

Naomi Weisstein

Naomi Weisstein’s career ran the gamut from feminist rock musician to groundbreaking psychologist to stand-up comedian.

Savina Teubal

Savina Teubal created space for Jewish women to participate in holidays and rituals, and created a powerful new tradition to recognize her own rite of passage from adult to elder.

Meredith Tax

Meredith Tax used her writing both to highlight the tremendous upheaval of her own times and to reimagine the struggles of suffragists and union organizers.

Barbara Seaman

Medical journalist Barbara Seaman exposed the risks of birth control pills, making them the first-ever prescription drug to include an FDA warning health on possible side effects.

Letty Cottin Pogrebin

Both in her own writing and as founding editor of Ms. magazine, Letty Cottin Pogrebin gave voice to the driving concerns of women in the feminist movement.

Judith Plaskow

Judith Plaskow created a new Jewish feminist theology through her scholarly masterwork, Standing Again at Sinai.

Tillie Olsen

Tillie Olsen’s own struggles to combine writing with working and raising a family spurred her to recover the writing of other silenced women writers, revolutionizing the study of women’s literature.

Joan Nestle

Driven by the concern that “the colonized are condemned to lose their memory,” lesbian writer and activist Joan Nestle created the Lesbian Herstory Archives.

Sheryl Baron Nestel

Sheryl Baron Nestel’s activism in the childbirth reform movement led to her investigation of how race and racism affect healthcare.

Gerda Lerner

As the creator of some of the earliest courses in women’s studies and the chair of the conference that sparked what became National Women’s History Month, Gerda Lerner made contributions beyond measure to the field of women’s studies.

Francine Klagsbrun

From Free to Be … You and Me to Women of the Wall, Francine Klagsbrun pushed to change what possibilities were open for women.

Loolwa Khazzoom

A pioneer of the Jewish multicultural movement, Loolwa Khazoom helped promote Sephardic and Mizrahi culture and priorities within the larger Jewish community.

Evelyn Fox Keller

Evelyn Fox Keller’s work in gender, biology, and the history of science led her to question the gendered metaphors and assumptions of biologists and sociologists, which often blinded them to basic scientific facts.

Melanie Kaye/Kantrowitz

Both in her activism and in her writing, Melanie Kaye/Kantrowitz offered Jews new ways to think about and fight racism.

Paula Hyman

Paula Hyman’s work as a historian recovered the stories of Jewish women’s pasts, while her work as a member of Ezrat Nashim helped create new possibilities for their future by pushing the Conservative Movement to ordain women rabbis.

Florence Howe

Florence Howe’s Feminist Press not only created a platform for modern feminist authors and scholars but helped the American public rediscover amazing women authors who had been long forgotten.

Susannah Heschel

As a scholar and author, Susannah Heschel has explored issues of Jewish feminism and 19th and 20th century German Jewish history.

Nancy Miriam Hawley

Nancy Miriam Hawley helped found the Boston Women's Health Book Collective, Inc., the organization responsible for writing the best seller Our Bodies, Ourselves, which empowered women to take control of their own health care.

Rivka Haut

An Orthodox Jewish feminist, Rivka Haut advocated on behalf of agunot (chained wives) and wrote feminist prayers for Orthodox Jews.
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