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Betty Friedan

Reading 'The Feminine Mystique' in 2021

Betsy More

On Betty Friedan's 100th birthday, we reflect on her seminal work, The Feminine Mystique.

Susan Stamberg

Susan Stamberg, the first full-time woman anchor of a national nightly news broadcast, played an important role in making National Public Radio (NPR) a news organization that offered pioneering opportunities to women journalists. Her half-century career at NPR opened the way for other women by demonstrating competence, originality, and compassion in reporting and interviewing. 

Frances Rosenthal Kallison

Frances Elaine Rosenthal Kallison was a horsewoman and historian, a cofounder of the Texas Jewish Historical Society, and the only Jewish woman in the National Museum and Cowgirl Hall of Fame.  A regional leader of the National Council of Jewish Women, she lobbied to end the poll tax and open pre-natal clinics for the poor. The exhibit she curated on Texas Jewry for the 1968 World’s Fair in San Antonio has been continually updated.

Barbara Kirshenblatt-Gimblett

Barbara Kirshenblatt-Gimblett is an American folklorist who is a scholar of Jewish cultures of Eastern Europe, North America, and Israel, museums, heritage, and tourism, as well as a curator of exhibits and documentarian. She is Chief Curator of the core exhibit of the POLIN Museum of Jewish history in Warsaw.

Wendy Perron

Wendy Perron is a dance writer, educator, teacher, performer, and choreographer. Across her thirteen-year tenure at Dance Magazine, Perron contributed nearly 1,000 individual pieces of dance journalism.

Jamaica Kincaid

Born Elaine Cynthia Potter Richardson, Jamaica Kincaid is a Jewish Afro-Caribbean author. She was sent to the United States from her birthplace in Antigua at the age of sixteen and became a writer while living in the United States.

Episode 53: Sabrina Orah Mark Writes Into Brokenness

Writer and poet Sabrina Orah Mark joins us for the final episode in our four part series on creativity in pandemic times. Her monthly essays in The Paris Review are loosely based on motherhood and fairy tales, and their texture is a rich weave of fairy tales, politics, the past, and her children’s voices. She describes her prose as having little poems folded up inside of it. In our conversation, Sabrina draws parallels between the ways that motherhood and quarantine have shaped her creative process.

Louise Glück

Louise Glück, American poet, essayist, and educator, is the recipient of the 2020 Nobel Prize in Literature, as well as numerous other awards for her writing; she also served as poet laureate of the United States from 2003 to 2004. One finds the personal, the mythological, and the Biblical woven intricately throughout Glück’s oeuvre.

How Yiddish Changed America cover cropped

What's Yiddish Got to Do with It?

Justine Orlovsky-Schnitzler

Ilan Stavans and Josh Lambart’s new anthology, How Yiddish Changed America, and America Changed Yiddish, is the perfect text to help you test the waters of Yiddishkeit. 

Elaine Weiss and book cover

An Interview with Elaine Weiss, Author of "The Woman’s Hour"

Betsy More

Exclusively for JWA, Elaine Weiss discusses her new book, The Woman's Hour, and the fight for women's suffrage in the United States.

"Wounds into Wisdom" cover cropped

Review: Tirzah Firestone's "Wounds into Wisdom"

Rabbi Beth Lieberman

We review Tirzah Firestone's latest book, Wounds into Wisdom, and discuss intergenerational trauma.

Topics: Non-Fiction
SoundMachine Blog Cover

Rachel Zucker on Her Book "SoundMachine"

Rachel Zucker

Author Rachel Zucker reflects on her new book, SoundMachine.

Topics: Non-Fiction, Poetry
Tiffany Shlain with "Technology Shabbats" sign

Tech Shabbat: Seeing the Light

Tiffany Shlain

Author Tiffany Shlain shares lessons she's learned from practicing "Tech Shabbat" for over 10 years.

Topics: Ritual, Non-Fiction

Episode 34: Emily Nussbaum Likes To Watch (Transcript)

Episode 34: Emily Nussbaum Likes To Watch (Transcript)

Book display for school social justice week

Standing for Social Justice at My School

Abigail Glickman

Every year, my high school hosts a Social Justice Week, and this year, I’m the primary organizer.

The Three Escapes of Hannah Arendt, page 228 CROP

Ken Krimstein on "The Three Escapes of Hannah Arendt"

Ken Krimstein

Exclusively for JWA, author and artist Ken Krimstein discusses his graphic novel, The Three Escapes of Hannah Arendt.

Evelyn Torton Beck

Evelyn Torton Beck: An Intersectional Role Model

Shira Minsk

Beck’s acknowledgment that Jewish lesbians had a unique struggle for acceptance and belonging in the feminist, lesbian, and Jewish communities was a radical move. She fought for more recognition and validation by feminist activists and lesbian activists, who she felt did not take her work seriously.

Jewish Radical Feminism, by Joyce Antler

An Interview With Joyce Antler about "Jewish Radical Feminism"

Joyce Antler

JWA sat down with Joyce Antler, renowned social and cultural historian, to discuss her most recent book, Jewish Radical Feminism: Voices from the Women's Liberation Movement.

Rena Lubin and Her Mother as Young Girls

The Power of Personal Histories

Rena Lubin

As an aspiring oral historian, I’ve always gotten chills when listening to recorded interviews. I love the interviewer’s inviting questions, the way the interviewee may leap into a narrative, the chance for the listener to peer into the interviewee’s past, and the powerful, sometimes nostalgic, recollection of a story.

Mother of All Questions Cover

The Mother of the Mother of All Questions

Emily Cataneo

The Mother of all Questions was published in 2017, and it is comprised mostly of essays written between 2014 and 2016. When Solnit wrote these essays, she didn’t know what would happen at the end of 2016, and how much disillusionment the ensuing eighteen months would bring.

Topics: Non-Fiction
Gerda Lerner at Sarah Lawrence College

10 Quotes from the Jewish Founder of Women's History Month

Abby Richmond
Bella Book

Here are some choice quotes on marginality, what progress looks like, and why women’s history matters, from the Jewish woman who started it all!

Kathy Green

By reflecting on her life in the context of her family of origin, the community of her childhood, and the historical framework of her time, Kathy deepened our knowledge and understanding of Kathy and the loneliness and losses that shaped her. She also expanded the data that form the stuff of history—shedding new light on growing up female, American and Jewish in small town America, the immigrant experience, assimilation and anti-Semitism, and Jewish women’s religious needs and search for meaning.

The H-Spot Book Cover

More than “Galentine's Day”: Recognizing Female Friendships

Rabbi Leah Berkowitz

Recently, a few of my clergywomen friends dropped by a congregational Shabbat dinner, and we spent the latter half of the evening catching up while people finished their meal. Some members of my community didn’t know how to process the presence of these women at my table, and a few expressed resentment that my attention was divided.

Jaclyn Friedman

Video Interview with Jaclyn Friedman

Judith Rosenbaum
An interview with Jacyln Friedman about her book, .
Unscrewed Close-up title image

Unscrewing Ourselves

Bella Book

Friedman’s book dives into the national narrative of female sexual submissiveness that’s perpetuated by our patriarchal culture. This narrative comes in the form of abstinence-only sex education, widespread toxic masculinity, and a collective reluctance to support women’s sexuality on a social and political level.

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