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Natural Science

Gertrude Elion

Gertrude Elion's accomplishments over the course of her long career as a chemist were tremendous. Among the many drugs she developed were the first chemotherapy for childhood leukemia, the immunosuppressant that made organ transplantation possible, the first effective anti-viral medication, and treatments for lupus, hepatitis, arthritis, gout, and other diseases.

Maxine Frank Singer steps down as head of Carnegie Institution

December 31, 2002

Maxine Frank Singer, a leading biochemistry researcher and advocate of science education, stepped down after fourteen years as the president of the Carnegie Institution, a major national scientific research center.

Dr. Gerty Theresa Radnitz Cori wins Nobel Prize

December 10, 1947

Dr. Gerty Theresa Radnitz Cori became the first American woman to receive a Nobel Prize in science.

Rita Levi-Montalcini wins the Nobel Prize

October 13, 1986

Rita Levi-Montalcini's pioneering work on nerve growth earned her the Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine.

Spotlight on work of AIDS activist Mathilde Krim

June 24, 1983

The "New York Times" reported on Mathilde Krim's newly established AIDS Medical Foundation.

Biochemist Maxine Frank Singer receives National Medal of Science

June 23, 1992

Maxine Frank Singer, a leading biochemistry researcher and advocate of science education, was awarded the National Medal of Science.

Frances Stern

Frances Stern’s experience as a second-generation American Jew dedicated to social reform, interested in education, and having the good fortune to come into contact with several prominent women engaged in various aspects of social work led her to a career in scientific nutrition, applied dietetics, and home economics.

Maxine Singer

Throughout her career, Maxine Singer took leading roles influencing and refining the nation’s science policy, often in realms having social, moral, or ethical implications. Singer’s research contributions have ranged over several areas of biochemistry and molecular biology, including chromatin structure, the structure and evolution of defective viruses, and enzymes that work on DNA and its complementary molecule, RNA.

Science in Israel

In October 2003 the European Commission published She Figures, a survey on women in science and technology in member countries and associates (including Israel), which cited statistics and other data that provide a basis for measuring the degree of progress towards equality of the sexes in these spheres.

Margarete Zuelzer

Margarete Zuelzer’s life epitomizes both the successes and frustrations of women scientists in academia in the first half of the twentieth century. One of the first generation of women scientists in Germany and also one of the first to receive an appointment in a ministry of the Weimar Republic, she was forced to flee from Nazi Germany. Unable to find refuge, she was murdered in 1943.

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How to cite this page

Jewish Women's Archive. "Natural Science." (Viewed on December 16, 2017) <https://jwa.org/topics/natural-science>.

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