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Military

Phoebe Yates Levy Pember given charge of Confederate military hospital

November 29, 1862

In a letter, Phoebe Yates Levy Pember informed her sister that she was about to become a top administrator at the Confederacy's largest military hospital.

Anna Rosenberg, first woman to receive Medal of Freedom

October 29, 1945

Anna Rosenberg became the first woman to receive the Medal of Freedom, the highest civilian award given by the United States.

Rabbi and military chaplain Bonnie Koppell profiled

August 31, 1990

Rabbi Bonnie Koppell, the first female Jewish chaplain in the U.S. military, was profiled in the "Omaha Jewish Press."

Union troops arrest Confederate spy Eugenia Levy Phillips

August 24, 1861

Eugenia Levy Phillips was arrested as a Confederate spy.

Miriam Miller joins the WAVES

July 30, 1942

The WAVES program, enlisting female volunteers in the U.S. Navy, was established. Miriam Miller was among the first enlistees.

Susan Sontag publishes last essay

May 23, 2004

Susan Sontag's last essay, "Regarding the Torture of Others," was published in the "New York Times Magazine."

Florence Prag Kahn elected as first Jewish woman in U.S. Congress

February 17, 1925

Florence Prag Kahn won a special election, becoming the fifth woman and first Jewish woman to serve in the United States Congress.

Haganah

Although there has been much academic interest in assorted aspects of the history of the Haganah, the subject of women in that organization has not yet merited an in-depth study, despite the considerable contribution of women in the Haganah during the struggle to establish the State of Israel. The present article is based on interviews conducted with some thirty women from various sectors of the population, who were active in the Haganah. The overall treatment of the various orientations among the women stems, among other things, from the information that emerged from these interviews.

Deborah: Bible

Deborah is one of the major judges (meaning charismatic leaders, rather than juridical figures) in the story of how Israel takes the land of Canaan.

Deborah 2: Midrash and Aggadah

Deborah is presented in the Rabbinic sources as a very talented woman. She was an upright judge, with the same prophetic ability as Samuel; [jwa_encyclopedia_glossary:424]Torah[/jwa_encyclopedia_glossary] scholars would come to learn from her. This ability was granted her as reward for her good deeds, namely, the preparation of wicks for the Tabernacle. She also encouraged her fellow Israelites to regularly attend the synagogue and Tabernacle, and thanks to her beneficial influence on her husband, he merited a portion in the World to Come. There is a tradition that presents Deborah as being guilty of the sin of pride, which led to her loss of the gift of prophecy, while the other traditions speak in her praise, and number her among the twenty-three Israelite women of outstanding righteousness ([jwa_encyclopedia_glossary:357]Midrash[/jwa_encyclopedia_glossary] Tadshe, Ozar ha-Midrashim [ed. Eisenstein], 474).

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How to cite this page

Jewish Women's Archive. "Military." (Viewed on December 16, 2017) <https://jwa.org/topics/military>.

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