Medicine

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Naomi Deutsch

A leader in the field of public health nursing, Naomi Deutch spearheaded health and sanitation campaigns in the US, Central America, and the Caribbean.

Frances Allen de Ford

Doctor Frances Allen de Ford pioneered hygiene initiatives in the malaria-ridden, working-class Kensington district of Philadelphia.

Ray Karchmer Daily

Ophthalmologist Ray Karchmer Daily fought to eliminate the subtle barriers that kept others from succeeding, arguing for dormitories for female medical students and free school lunches for needy children.

Claribel Cone

Claribel Cone made contributions to two vastly different fields as a biologist and a patron of modern French art.

Anna Pavitt Boudin

Anna Pavitt Boudin defied expectations throughout her career, both as one of the first women dentists in America and as the founder and president of the Women’s American ORT, one of the largest Jewish women’s organizations in America.

Fanny Berlin

One of the first Jewish women to practice medicine in the US, Fanny Berlin overcame countless obstacles to become the respected chief surgeon of a major hospital.

Margaret Gene Arnstein

Margaret Gene Arnstein’s belief that nurses should be involved in health policy and research helped transform her profession.

Naomi Amir

Naomi Kassan Amir was a pioneer in pediatric neurology in part because of her holistic approach, seeing each child not just in terms of their disability but in the context of their family and their community.

Birth of Cancer Patient Advocate Rose Kushner

June 22, 1929

"We women should be free, knowledgeable, and completely conscious when the time comes for a decision, so that we can make it for ourselves." Cancer patient advocate Rose Kushner

Dr. Liebe Sokol Diamond joins the Baltimore Jewish Hall of Fame

June 12, 2013

"The most skillful hand is the most invisible one.” - Dr. Liebe Sokol Diamond

Hannah Sandusky

Called “the angel” and “the saint” by her patients, midwife Hannah Sandusky was remarkable both for the sheer number of births she oversaw and for the respect that male doctors granted her for her skills.

Alice Bailes

Alice Bailes joined the resurgence of natural childbirth in America both as a midwife and as coeditor of The Handbook on Home Birth.

Rosa Fineberg

Rosa Edelhurst Fineberg kept detailed records of her work as a midwife that shed light on the lives of Jewish immigrants at the turn of the century.

June Finer

June Finer took part in civil rights protests during Freedom Summer through the Medical Committee for Human Rights, beginning a long career at the intersection of medicine and activism.

Frances Slanger

One of four nurses to wade ashore at Normandy Beach on D-Day, Frances Slanger was the only nurse to die as a result of enemy action in the European Theater.

Marita Silverman

Marita Silverman used the compassion and strength she learned working as a nurse in a field hospital in Vietnam to fuel her work in civilian life as a pediatric nurse.

Ethel Gladstone

Ethel Gladstone only joined the US Army Nurse Corps at the tail end of World War I, but her service record shows how long a war’s impact can be felt after its official end.

Charlotte Chaney

Lieutenant Charlotte Ellner Chaney was permanently changed by her work as one of the first army nurses to help survivors of Dachau recover from their ordeal.

Phoebe Yates Levy Pember

Phoebe Yates Levy Pember managed a hospital through the chaos of the Civil War and left an account of her life that offered a window into daily life for Jews in Southern high society.

Rosanna Dyer Osterman

Rosanna Dyer Osterman’s supplies helped travelers explore the western frontier, but it was her life-saving efforts as a nurse for which she was best remembered.

Tehilla Lichtenstein

Lichtenstein cofounded Jewish Science with her husband as an alternative to Christian Science, creating a small but passionate following and carving a place for herself as a congregational leader.

Rita Levi-Montalcini

Rita Levi-Montalcini won the Nobel Prize for her work in discovering nerve growth factor, crucial for understanding neurodegenerative disorders like ALS, Parkinson’s, and Alzheimer’s.

Rae D. Landy

A disciplined administrator who put her own safety at risk time and again for others, Rae Landy helped Hadassah establish the first nursing service in Israel and then served as a military nurse in the US Armed Services.

Mathilde Krim

Mathilde Krim made tremendous contributions to fighting AIDS both directly as a scientist and through fundraising as the creator of AmfAR, the American Foundation for AIDS Research.

Helene Deutsch

The first psychologist to focus on women, Helene Deutsch investigated issues ranging from motherhood to female sexuality.
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