Medicine

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Collection

Judith Graham Pool

Physiologist Judith Graham Pool revolutionized the treatment of hemophilia by isolating factor VIII and creating a concentrate made from blood plasma that could be frozen, stored, and used by hemophiliacs in their own homes.

Virginia Morris Pollak

Virginia Morris Pollak’s artistic career and her longtime community service collided in WWII when she used her deep understanding of clay, plaster, and metal to revolutionize reconstructive surgery for wounded servicemen.

Seraphine Eppstein Pisko

As executive secretary and vice president of the National Jewish Hospital for Consumptives in Denver, Seraphine Eppstein Pisko was one of the first women to lead a national Jewish institution.

Berta Ottenstein

Despite repeatedly needing to restart her career when she fled from Nazi-held territories, Berta Ottenstein earned great respect for her pioneering research in the field of dermatology.

Bessie Louise Moses

Bessie Louise Moses made huge strides for birth control as a doctor, a teacher of medicine, and author of Contraception as a Therapeutic Measure in 1936.

Henrietta Szold sends nurses Rose Kaplan and Rachel Landy to Palestine to begin the work of Hadassah.

January 18, 1913
"This is what your group ought to do … You should do practical work in Palestine."

Jessie Marmorston

Jessie Marmorston’s research into hormone secretion led to breakthroughs in our understanding of the ways stress can contribute to heart attacks and certain cancers.

Margaret Mahler

Margaret Schönberger Mahler pioneered theories on child development and abnormal psychology that impacted generations of psychiatrists.

Fannie Eller Lorber

When her community became a mecca for adults suffering from tuberculosis, Fannie Eller Lorber created a Jewish children’s home for those who had no one else to care for them.

Fania Mindell arrested for distributing birth control materialf

October 26, 1916

Fania Mindell, Margaret Sanger, and Ethel Byrne opened the first birth control clinic in the United States in Brooklyn in 1916.

Gertrude Elion / Nina Fefferman

Scientists

Leaders in the Lab

Hedy Lamarr / Mayim Bialik

Actress-Scientists

Stars of STEM and Screen

Nina Fefferman

Evolutionary biologist and epidemiologist Nina Fefferman uses mathematical models to chart how individual choices ripple outward to affect whole groups, helping create strategies to save populations from endangered tortoises to human communities stricken by disease.

Lena Kenin

Lena Nemerovsky Kenin made major contributions to both gynecology and psychology with her successful medical practice and her groundbreaking work on postpartum depression.

Joyce Jacobson Kaufman

Joyce Jacobson Kaufman’s groundbreaking work in chemistry and physics led to major advancements for the designs of compounds ranging from pharmacological drugs to rocket fuel.

Rose Kaplan

Despite her own failing health, Rose Kaplan insisted on nursing Jewish settlers in Palestine and refugees in Egypt and inspired others to follow her example.

Regina Kaplan

Regina “Kappy” Kaplan helped break down gender barriers in medicine by creating the first nursing school in the South that admitted male students.

Anna Kaplan

Anna Kaplan helped transform nursing in Israel by holding it to the best standards of medical care from around the world.

Charlotte Friend

Cell biologist and immunologist Charlotte Friend furthered our understanding of cancer through her discovery of a virus that could transmit leukemia.

Amelia Greenwald

Amelia Greenwald focused her career in public health nursing on training other nurses and creating infrastructure in war-ravaged Europe.

Käte Frankenthal

A doctor and military surgeon who smoked cigars and drank beer and whiskey, Käte Frankenthal refused to be limited to traditional women’s roles.

Luba Robin Goldsmith

A respected doctor and teacher of medicine, Luba Robin Goldsmith created a supportive environment for women who followed her into medicine.

Rita Sapiro Finkler

Rita Sapiro Finkler was a pioneer in the field of endocrinology, making important discoveries about the role hormones play in pregnancy, menopause, and other aspects of women’s health.

Death of pediatric allergist Gail Greenberg Shapiro

August 25, 2006

Dr. Gail G. Shapiro treated over 36,000 asthma patients over 31 years of work at the same hospital.

Claire Fagin

Claire Fagin’s groundbreaking studies on parents and children changed hospital practices around the country long before her term as the first female interim president of an Ivy League university opened new possibilities for women in academia.
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