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Law

Marta Friedländer-Garelik

Marta Friedländer-Garelik’s early visit to a factory convinced her to stay in school and become a lawyer, but ironically, working in a factory during WWII sent her on a new path to become a clothing designer.

Mary Belle Grossman

Mary Belle Grossman made history in 1918 as one of the first two women admitted to the American Bar Association, then dedicated her career to protecting women.

Magdalen Flexner

Magdalen Flexner worked as an American ambassador in Europe, serving for decades as consul general in France at a time when women were rarely given such responsibility.

Edith Fisch

Edith Fisch literally wrote the book on evidence, a text regularly cited by judges and used in law schools throughout New York. Confined to a wheelchair by a childhood bout of polio, Fisch hit a literal roadblock in her ambitions to become a chemist: all the available graduate schools had stairs.

Susan Brandeis Gilbert

The daughter of Supreme Court Justice Louis D. Brandeis, Susan Brandeis Gilbert became one of the first women attorneys to argue a case before the Supreme Court.

Losing Their Religion: A Law Professor Looks at Hobby Lobby

There are many reasons I think the Supreme Court is wrong as a legal matter in Burwell v. Hobby Lobby. I think corporations are entitled to certain kinds of basic economic privileges, but I don’t think corporations are “people” under the Religious Freedom Restoration Act (RFRA) or the First Amendment.

Rita Charmatz Davidson

Rita Charmatz Davidson’s career in the Maryland court system was a series of firsts, leading to her 1979 appointment as the first woman on the Maryland Court of Appeals, the highest judicial body in the state.

Felice Cohn

Felice Cohn was one of Nevada’s first women lawyers and the fourth woman permitted to argue before the US Supreme Court.

Helen Lehman Buttenwieser

As a lawyer, Helen Lehman Buttenwieser fought to protect children in the foster care system.

Emilie M. Bullowa

As a lawyer and activist, Emilie M. Bullowa devoted her life to justice for the disenfranchised, arguing, “Our democracy doesn’t work if the people who can’t afford … legal aid can’t get justice.”

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How to cite this page

Jewish Women's Archive. "Law." (Viewed on December 13, 2017) <https://jwa.org/topics/law>.

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