Law

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Collection

Birth of Harriet Fleischl Pilpel, pioneer for the right to privacy and free speech

December 2, 1911

Lawyer Harriet Fleischl Pilpel provides the historical link between birth control activist Margaret Sanger and feminist Betty Friedan.

Martine Rothblatt

CEO Martine Rothblatt’s fascination with interconnectivity led her to found both GeoStar and Sirius Radio, but it was her drive to save her daughter’s life that led her to create biotech company United Therapeutics Corporation.

Harriet Lowenstein

Harriet Lowenstein gave the Joint Distribution Committee its name and led many of the organization’s efforts to aid those trapped in Europe during both World Wars.

Anna Moscowitz Kross

Anna Moscowitz Kross helped reform the New York prison system by curbing abuses and offering felons chances to train in new skills.

Ida Klaus

Ida Klaus made great strides for labor rights as the architect of the first code of labor laws for New York City employees and as a consultant to presidents from Franklin Delano Roosevelt to Jimmy Carter.

Carol Weiss King

Carol Weiss King took up the family business of law but rejected her family’s upper-crust background to become a pioneer of labor rights.

Phyllis A. Kravitch

Phyllis A. Kravitch became the third woman circuit court judge in the US in 1979 and served her home state of Georgia for decades.

Aline Kaplan

As executive director of Hadassah, Aline Kaplan credited the organization’s success to the commitment of its volunteers, whose numbers grew to a staggering 370,000 during her tenure.

Fanny E. Holtzmann

Fanny E. Holtzmann made waves as a lawyer for stars of Broadway and Hollywood as well as luminaries of world politics such as the Romanoffs.

Elizabeth Holtzman

The youngest woman ever elected to Congress at age 32, Elizabeth Holtzman focused her political career on human rights.

Anna Weiner Hochfelder

Anna Weiner Hochfelder used her legal expertise to help women’s groups serve their members more effectively.

Frieda Barkin Hennock

The first woman ever appointed to the Federal Communications Commission, Frieda Barkin Hennock argued that women had a disproportionate stake in the media and helped establish public broadcasting.

Hattie Leah Henenberg

Due to highly unusual circumstances, Hattie Leah Henenberg became a member of the first all-female state Supreme Court when almost every male judge and lawyer in the state had to recuse themselves from a case.

Rita Eleanor Hauser

Rita E. Hauser’s dual background in politics and international law led to her key role in persuading Yasser Arafat and the Palestine Liberation Organization to recognize Israel and renounce terrorism.

Jane Harman

Using the slogan, “This woman will clean House,” Jane Harman won the first of her nine terms as a congresswoman before becoming the first woman president and CEO of the Woodrow Wilson International Center for Scholars.

Marta Friedländer-Garelik

Marta Friedländer-Garelik’s early visit to a factory convinced her to stay in school and become a lawyer, but ironically, working in a factory during WWII sent her on a new path to become a clothing designer.

Mary Belle Grossman

Mary Belle Grossman made history in 1918 as one of the first two women admitted to the American Bar Association, then dedicated her career to protecting women.

Magdalen Flexner

Magdalen Flexner worked as an American ambassador in Europe, serving for decades as consul general in France at a time when women were rarely given such responsibility.

Edith Fisch

Edith Fisch literally wrote the book on evidence, a text regularly cited by judges and used in law schools throughout New York. Confined to a wheelchair by a childhood bout of polio, Fisch hit a literal roadblock in her ambitions to become a chemist: all the available graduate schools had stairs.

Susan Brandeis Gilbert

The daughter of Supreme Court Justice Louis D. Brandeis, Susan Brandeis Gilbert became one of the first women attorneys to argue a case before the Supreme Court.
Hobby Lobby and the United States Supreme Court

Losing Their Religion: A Law Professor Looks at Hobby Lobby

Jed Handelsman Shugerman

There are many reasons I think the Supreme Court is wrong as a legal matter in Burwell v. Hobby Lobby.

Topics: Law

Rita Charmatz Davidson

Rita Charmatz Davidson’s career in the Maryland court system was a series of firsts, leading to her 1979 appointment as the first woman on the Maryland Court of Appeals, the highest judicial body in the state.

Felice Cohn

Felice Cohn was one of Nevada’s first women lawyers and the fourth woman permitted to argue before the US Supreme Court.

Helen Lehman Buttenwieser

As a lawyer, Helen Lehman Buttenwieser fought to protect children in the foster care system.

Emilie M. Bullowa

As a lawyer and activist, Emilie M. Bullowa devoted her life to justice for the disenfranchised, arguing, “Our democracy doesn’t work if the people who can’t afford … legal aid can’t get justice.”
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