You are here

Share Share Share Share Share Share Share

Judaism

Irma Levy Lindheim

Called “the grandmother” of the kibbutz for helping found and sustain multiple kibbutzim, Irma Levy Lindheim also made phenomenal contributions to fundraising and organizational efforts to create and maintain the fledgling State of Israel.

Babette Deutsch

In her poetry, novels, and translations, Babette Deutsch interwove elements of vastly different cultures and times, from the Bible and Shakespeare to Russian and Japanese literature.

Susannah Heschel

As a scholar and author, Susannah Heschel has explored issues of Jewish feminism and 19th and 20th century German Jewish history.

Sally Gottesman

As a teenager, Sally Gottesman lobbied for the first Saturday morning bat mitzvah at her synagogue; as an adult, she created groups for teens of both genders to discover a deeper connection to Judaism.

Aviva Cantor

Aviva Cantor not only created a powerful forum for Jewish feminists by cofounding Lilith magazine, she went on to invent a “unified field theory” of Jewish history that offered compelling possibilities for egalitarianism.

Roz Garber

Roz Garber evaded the KGB to bring hope to refuseniks in the USSR.

Dorothy Franco Muscatel

A vibrant social organizer, Dorothy Franco Muscatel was born in Seattle in 1917 to parents who, in 1910, were among the first Sephardic Jews to immigrate to Seattle from Rhodes, Greece. Her parents and grandmother were instrumental in creating important Seattle Jewish institutions, including the Sephardic cemetery. Dorothy learned from their example. Her achievements include helping form Seattle chapters for The City of Hope and Guide Dogs for the Blind; and service as president of the Seattle Sephardic Sisterhood and Sephardic Bikur Holim Ladies' Auxiliary. Married to Jack Muscatel and mother of three, Dorothy continued to shine the light of her family and herself on Seattle’s Jewish and secular communities until her death on December 26, 2003.

Susan Weidman Schneider

The cover of the first issue featured our artist's version of the Jewish superwoman, who managed to amalgamate almost all possible roles...

Debbie Friedman

The more our voices are heard in song, the more we become our lyrics, our prayers, and our convictions.

Tamara Cohen

I floated between moments of exaltation at what we were creating and moments of exasperation and tears at the difficulty of it all.

Pages

How to cite this page

Jewish Women's Archive. "Judaism." (Viewed on February 20, 2019) <https://jwa.org/topics/judaism>.

Donate

Help us elevate the voices of Jewish women.

donate now

The JWA Podcast

listen now

Sign Up for JWA eNews

 

Discover Education Programs

Join our growing community of educators.

view programs