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Jewish Education

Understanding Primary Sources

What is a primary source? How can you use primary sources in your teaching to engage and inspire students? Learn more about these important resources and how to use them effectively to enhance your teaching.

Women’s strides spotlighted this spring at Reform Movement’s graduations, ordinations

This month marks 40 years since the ordination of the first woman rabbi in America. And the Reform Movement is doing some serious celebrating.

Breaking free from tradition: New ideas for Passover learning

Watch The Prince of Egypt. Throw the toy frogs. Have a chocolate seder. Create artistic interpretations of the Ten Plagues.

Bernice W. Kliman, 1933 - 2011

An outstanding Shakespearean, dedicated editor, and wonderful colleague, Bernice W. Kliman brought vibrancy, enthusiasm, and intellectual curiosity to all she did. She was a woman of unbounded energy and sense of humor, characterized by her decorative stockings and delightful swagger.

Foremost among her many accomplishments was her Shakespearean scholarship as editor of the Variorum Hamlet, as a member and often chair of the Columbia University Shakespeare Seminar, but most especially her pioneering research of film productions of Shakespeare.

Shulamith Soloveitchik Meiselman, 1912 - 2009

My grandmother, Shulamith Soloveitchik Meiselman, was an incredibly special person. She combined great warmth and caring with a keen intellect and a zest for life and a resolve to work on behalf of her people, whether as a volunteer involved in the student Zionist movement, as a leader and teacher in the start of the day school movement and as the matriarch of her family.

Institute for Educators 2012 | Jewish Women's Archive

The Power of Our Stories

Jewish Women's Archive

My "out of this world" bat mitzvah

My bat mitzvah party theme was outer space. Each of the tables were named after the nine planets in the solar system at the time: Mercury, Venus, Mars.

Learning and teaching bat mitzvah: It goes both ways

“But there’s so much to learn!” This is the traditional lament of every bat mitzvah girl I have tutored, and I’m sure it escaped my lips a few times when I was preparing for my own bat mitzvah as well. Between the prayers, the Torah portion, the Haftarah, the d’var Torah, and everything else a bat mitzvah entails, there is no doubt that in becoming a bat mitzvah there is quite a lot to learn. But I would like to offer an alternative framework: the bat mitzvah girl not as a learner, but as a teacher.

El Adon-think-so: Battling singer's block with help from my mom

My New Jersey bat mitzvah party was a lavish affair.

Sharing stories, inspiring change: Lessons from the Institute

Ask any one of my friends or family members: in the weeks leading up to JWA’s Institute for Educators, I was a mess. As the dishes piled up on my desk at the office and my eyeballs crossed from looking at spreadsheet after spreadsheet of catering orders and flight information, a battle between stress and excitement raged in my mind.


How to cite this page

Jewish Women's Archive. "Jewish Education." (Viewed on March 18, 2018) <>.


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