Holocaust

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Haika Grosman

From Zionist leadership in war-wracked Europe to her career in the Israeli Knesset, Haika Grosman displayed uncommon strength of character and steadfastness to her ideals.

Jeane Herskovits Gottesman

Jeane Herskovits Gottesman helped raise essential funds for Jewish organizations ranging from Yeshiva University to Hadassah’s Youth Aliyah program, which helped save Jewish children from Europe during the Holocaust.

S. Deborah Ebin

The daughter of Mizrachi movement leader Rabbi Aaron M. Ashinsky, S. Deborah Ebin helped the group American Mizrachi Women rescue a staggering number of children from Europe during and after WWII.

Sophia Dubnow-Erlich

Sophia Dubnow-Erlich’s socialist views were reflected both in her acclaimed poetry and in her passionate activism.

Lucy S. Dawidowicz

Lucy S. Dawidowicz believed that her passion for the shtetls she had known and her experiences working with Holocaust survivors in postwar Germany made her a better historian.

Two women’s lives collide in the film “Inheritance”

June 29, 2006

"In these women's tears and twisted smiles ... are the living wounds of history."

Dina Abramowicz

After surviving the Holocaust, Dina Abramowicz reconstituted her rich cultural heritage as the formidable head librarian of the YIVO Institute for Jewish Research.

Shelley Winters

An actress who cared deeply about the world, Shelley Winters donated the Oscar she won for her role as Mrs. Van Daan in The Diary of Anne Frank to Otto Frank.

Simone Veil

Simone Veil fought for women’s rights as a member of the French Parliament, and the 1975 law allowing women the right to an abortion bears her name.

Selma Stern-Taeubler

Both as a historian and a novelist, Selma Stern-Taeubler traced the experience of German Jewry from the tolerant era of eighteenth century Prussia to her own experience of living in Nazi Germany.

Charlotte Chaney

Lieutenant Charlotte Ellner Chaney was permanently changed by her work as one of the first army nurses to help survivors of Dachau recover from their ordeal.

Anne Roiphe

A prolific journalist, essayist and novelist, Anne Roiphe is known for tackling issues of feminism and Jewish identity in her writing.

Sophie Maslow

Sophie Maslow blended classical, modern, and folk traditions in her dance and choreography and drew inspiration from politics and modern folk music to create vibrant new pieces that engaged audiences in new ways.

Deborah Lipstadt

Deborah Lipstadt stuck a major blow against Holocaust deniers when she won her landmark libel case against David Irving.

Ilona Karmel

Ilona Karmel wrote two powerful novels based on her experiences in the Holocaust and its aftermath.

Anne Frank

Anne Frank’s remarkable honesty and gift for writing made her diary one of the most well-known books in the world, and made her an icon of all those lost in the Holocaust.

Babette Deutsch

In her poetry, novels, and translations, Babette Deutsch interwove elements of vastly different cultures and times, from the Bible and Shakespeare to Russian and Japanese literature.

Hannah Arendt

Hannah Arendt grappled with the Holocaust throughout her lifetime, creating the concept of “the banality of evil” to understand the widespread complicity in the mass killings.

Madeleine Kunin

Madeline Kunin broke ground as the first woman governor of Vermont and the only woman to serve three terms as governor before making history again as ambassador to Switzerland, facilitating compensation from Swiss banks to Holocaust survivors.

Gay Block

Gay Block’s photography allowed her to explore surprising facets of her subjects, from girls at summer camp to Holocaust survivors to her own mother.
"But the Giraffe and Brundibar" Front Cover by  Tony Kushner

But the Giraffe

by  Miriam Cantor-Stone

Last weekend, I was fortunate enough to catch the final performance of Underground Railway Theater’s Brundibar & But the Giraffe, which was actually two plays separated by an intermission. The first of which, But the Giraffe, by multiple-award-winning playwright Tony Kushner, is about a little girl given a choice; her family is frantically packing up their belongings, and there is very little room left in their suitcase, and she must choose between bringing her beloved toy giraffe or the score of an opera for children, Brundibar.

Topics: Holocaust, Theater

Marillyn Tallman

Marillyn Tallman helped Jews make new lives for themselves during some of the most monumental conflicts of the twentieth century.

Jill Weinberg

A career serving the Jewish Federation brought Jill Weinberg to her life’s work as the first director of the Midwest Regional Office of the US Holocaust Memorial Museum.

Denise Schorr

As a member of the French Resistance, Denise Schorr began saving Jewish children when she was still just seventeen.

Anne Jackson

Motivated by a desire to experience life and have her voice heard, Anne Jackson participated in community activism ranging from the March on Washington to Holocaust education.
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