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Holocaust

Gertrude Scharff Goldhaber

Gertrude Scharff Goldhaber was above all a dedicated physicist.

Mire Gola

At the age of seventeen Mire Gola was elected to the main Ha-Shomer ha-Za’ir leadership in Galicia and moved to Lvov, where the leadership was located.In 1932 she was expelled from Ha-Shomer ha-Za’ir because of her radical stand on relations with the Soviet Union.At this time she began to be active in the Communist Party.

Élisabeth Gille

Élisabeth Gille was born Élisabeth Epstein in Paris on May 20, 1937 and died of cancer on September 30, 1996, just as she was achieving a certain amount of fame for three critically-acclaimed books.

Marika Gidali

Dancer Marika Gidali was born in Budapest on April 29, 1937.

Karen Gershon

Poet Karen Gershon was born Kaethe Löwenthal, the youngest of three daughters of middle-class parents in Bielefeld, Germany, in 1923.

Germany: 1750-1945

To view German Jewish history from the Enlightenment through the Holocaust from a gender perspective deepens our understanding of history in general and provides us with a richer, more complex and more inclusive picture of the Jewish past.

Carl Friedman

The style and themes of Carl Friedman's books has made her unique among Dutch authors.

Marta Friedländer-Garelik

Although her mother tried to convince her to study medicine, Marta preferred law. In the summer semester of 1918 Friedländer enrolled in Vienna University’s law faculty, where she was one of the first women to venture into these studies.

Recha Freier

By founding the Youth [jwa_encyclopedia_glossary:293]Aliyah[/jwa_encyclopedia_glossary] (Jugend-Alijah) in Berlin, Germany in 1932, Recha Freier saved thousands of Jewish lives. She was a multi-talented woman, a poet and musician, a teacher and social activist. However, in most accounts of the Holocaust she has either been underestimated or totally unacknowledged.

Anne Frank

Anne Frank’s diary, particularly these sentences, became one of the central symbols of the Holocaust and of humanity faced with suffering: the strength of spirit that led a young girl to write such words after two years of imprisonment hidden in a small, crowded attic, decreed on her by senseless evil; and the opening which her words offer for a new era of hope and reconciliation after a world war that claimed tens of millions of victims. These words aroused great admiration for her diary and for the girl herself. Translated into more than fifty languages, the diary sold more than thirty million copies all over the world.

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How to cite this page

Jewish Women's Archive. "Holocaust." (Viewed on April 28, 2017) <https://jwa.org/topics/holocaust>.

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