Holocaust

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Adeline Schulberg

Adeline Schulberg’s long and winding career path led her from activist to Hollywood agent and back again.

Martha Schlamme

Martha Schlamme rose to popularity singing Yiddish and Hebrew songs at Catskills resorts, but was best known for her interpretations of Kurt Weill’s music.

Alice Schalek

Alice Schalek made a name for herself as Austria’s first female war photographer during WWI and went on to a stunning career as a photojournalist and travel writer.

Alice Salomon

Alice Salomon was honored as one of the founding mothers of social work in Germany for both the direct service organizations she created and her role as founding president of the International Association of Schools of Social Work.

Sylvia Rosner Rothchild

Sylvia Rosner Rothchild used her writing talents to turn oral history interviews with Holocaust survivors and Russian refuseniks into engaging accounts that challenged stereotypes and captured American mainstream audiences.

Hadassah Rosensaft

Showing incredible courage and ingenuity, Hadassah Bimko Rosensaft saved countless lives in the concentration camps and helped survivors recover from their ordeal.

Käte Rosenheim

As the tireless head of the Department of Children’s Emigration in the Reich Association of Jews in Germany, Käte Rosenheim managed to save over seven thousand Jewish children from the Nazis.

Norma Rosen

In her novels and essays, Norma Rosen found new and powerful ways to approach difficult issues from abortion to the Holocaust.

Tamar De Sola Pool

Lifelong Zionist Tamar de Sola Pool found a myriad of ways to serve during WWII, from running Hadassah to rescuing Jewish children.

International Holocaust Remembrance Day

January 27, 2015

JWA features many stories of the Holocaust era, those who were lost, those who survived, and those who aided people in peril. 

Lilli Palmer

Actress Lilli Palmer fled Nazi Germany to make a place for herself in Hollywood, but chose to return after the war, becoming celebrated once again in her home country.

Blanche Cohen Nirenstein

Blanche Cohen Nirenstein found a myriad of ways to help Jewish widows and needy children, from founding a kosher summer camp to supporting Holocaust survivors.
2014 Fireworks

Top Ten Moments For Jewish Women In 2014

by  Judith Rosenbaum

I’ve already expressed my feelings on the whole “year of the Jewish woman” thing, but that’s not to say we shouldn’t celebrate the many great moments for Jewish women in 2014. Here, in no particular order, are a few of our favorites at JWA.

Gertrud Amon Natzler

Ceramicist Gertrud Amon Natzler and her husband Otto created thousands of stunning ceramics together, an exquisite collaboration that continued even after her death.

Irene Nemirovsky

First censored and then killed during the Holocaust, novelist Irène Némirovsky finally achieved the recognition she deserved long after her death.

Hephzibah Menuhin

Hephzibah Menuhin had a stellar career as a pianist, but a visit to Theresienstadt in 1947 drew her to a new calling as a human rights activist.

Vladka Meed

Freedom fighter Vladka Meed smuggled dynamite into the Warsaw Ghetto to aid the Jewish uprising and helped children escape by hiding them in Christian homes.

Adele Rosenwald Levy

Philanthropist Adele Rosenwald Levy demonstrated her leadership skills and her passion for the Jewish community when she helped inspire American Jews to donate even more to aid Holocaust survivors than they had given to support the war effort.

Nora Levin

While her books sparked controversy among historians, Nora Levin helped shape popular understanding of modern Jewish history.

Blume Lempel

Told repeatedly from an early age that girls were not worth educating and that uneducated people couldn’t be writers, Blume Lempel defied expectations to write beautiful, unusually modernist Yiddish literature.

Malka Lee

Malka Lee’s lyrical Yiddish poems won over both critics and general American Jewish audiences, but it was her work dedicated to the family she lost in the Holocaust that had the most lasting impact.

Dr. Ruth Westheimer

Ruth Westheimer balanced unabashed practical advice about sexual health and safety with a playful sense of humor to educate the public and break down social taboos against discussing sex.

Ruth Klüger

Through her scholarship and her memoir about her experiences in the Holocaust, Ruth Klüger challenged popular assumptions about history, memory, and the role of women in society.

Gerda Weissmann Klein

Gerda Weissmann Klein used her experiences in the Holocaust to write children’s books that helped children grapple with difficult subjects.
Regina Jonas

Excerpts from the writings of Regina Jonas

by Tara Metal

The words of Regina Jonas continue to resonate with today’s rabbis.

Topics: Holocaust, Rabbis
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