Holocaust

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Hannah Szenes, 1944, cropped

Living A Life Of Valor

by Sarah Groustra

I don’t think I’m a very brave person. I’m normally quite timid, and taking a stand is something that does not come naturally to me. I sometimes hesitate to say what I really think for fear of how others will react, and I often find it easy to fade into the background in large groups.

Gusta Dawidson Draenger

Defiant to the end, Gusta Dawidson Draenger wrote Justina’s Diary, her account of the partisan struggles against the Nazis, on toilet paper in a Gestapo prison and inspired others to persevere when all hope seemed lost.

Ida Dehmel

Deeply enmeshed in German cultural life as a writer, salon hostess, and women’s rights activist, Ida Coblenz Dehmel found herself squeezed out of the very communities she had helped shape when the Nazis came to power.

Liza Czapnik

No one believed Liza Czapnik when she first reported on the massacre of Jews by Nazis in 1941, driving her to take a more active role as a partisan.

Sara Stone

Sara Stone was ninety years old at the time of Hurricane Katrina, and her experience of the storm was tempered by a lifetime of helping the city weather hard times.

Sara Stone

Sara Stone helped New Orleans weather hard times from the Great Depression through Hurricane Katrina.

Ruth Bondy

Journalist Ruth Bondy made larger events more relatable for readers through her insightful human interest stories.

Adele Bloch-Bauer

A wealthy socialite and salon hostess in her day, Adele Bloch-Bauer became the center of an historic legal case when her niece demanded the return of her portrait, stolen by the Nazis.

Elisabeth Bergner

Playfully titling her 1978 memoir Greatly Admired and Often Cursed, Elisabeth Bergner was famed both as the actress whom writers felt best captured their characters and as a former spy who helped other actors escape Nazi Germany.

Katja Behrens

Part of the first generation of postwar writers in Germany, Katja Behrens grapples with the often difficult relationship between German Jews and the majority.

Rivka Basman Ben-Hayim

Interweaving her personal experiences with nature imagery and Jewish legends, Rivka Basman Ben-Hayim became one of Israel’s most celebrated Yiddish poets.

Tatjana Barbakoff

The daughter of a Chinese mother and a Russian Jewish father, Tatjana Barbakoff used her mixed heritage as inspiration for stunning and innovative dance performances.

Rose Auslander

Confined to her bed and unable to write for a decade, the gifted poet Rose Ausländer dictated many of her works.

Rokhl Auerbakh

Rokhl Auerbakh’s determination to record everything she witnessed in the Holocaust led to her creating the questionnaires to capture other survivors’ stories for war crime trials and Holocaust memorials.

Myriam Anissimov

Joking that she is a Yiddish writer working in French, novelist Myriam Anissimov has been celebrated for her portrayal of the difficulties faced by children of Holocaust survivors.

Ziva Amishai-Maisels

As an art historian and curator for Yad Vashem, Ziva Amishai-Maisels became known for her insights into the impact of the Holocaust on modern art.

Anda Pinkerfeld Amir

Anda Pinkerfeld Amir helped shape two branches of Hebrew literature as an innovative, modernist Israeli poet and as a writer of children’s books that tackled difficult subjects like war and death.

Tosia Altman

Tosia Altman volunteered as a courier and weapons smuggler, risking her life through some of the worst conflicts of the Jewish uprising during the Holocaust.

Gila Almagor

Gila Almagor earned acclaim as a writer, actress, and filmmaker for her autobiographical Summer of Aviya in 1988, but when critics questioned details of her story, she embraced the criticism and went on to create a sequel, 1995’s Under the Domim Tree.

Rajzel Zychlinsky

Praised as one of the most original voices in modern Yiddish poetry, Rajzel Zychlinski used free verse and sparse language to capture the devastation of the Holocaust.

Nechama Tec

Nechama Tec’s experiences as a child in the Holocaust led to her career highlighting nontraditional stories of the Holocaust, and inspired the movie Defiance.

Lore Segal

Lore Segal’s life, including her transformative experiences during WWII, became the basis for her award-winning novels and children’s books.

Adeline Schulberg

Adeline Schulberg’s long and winding career path led her from activist to Hollywood agent and back again.

Martha Schlamme

Martha Schlamme rose to popularity singing Yiddish and Hebrew songs at Catskills resorts, but was best known for her interpretations of Kurt Weill’s music.

Alice Schalek

Alice Schalek made a name for herself as Austria’s first female war photographer during WWI and went on to a stunning career as a photojournalist and travel writer.
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