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Holocaust

Michal Govrin

As the child of a Holocaust survivor, Michal Govrin has used her writing to open a broader conversation about the enduring legacy of the Holocaust.

China's Jewish Sanctuary City

I should be able to tour the neighborhoods that sheltered hundreds of thousands of Jewish refugees in New York, Chicago, Boston, Montreal and Toronto, London and Manchester. But thanks to xenophobia, inaction, and fear, these neighborhoods never existed.

Karen Gershon

From early childhood, poet Karen Gershon expected to settle in Israel, but the chaos of WWII sent her in an entirely different direction.

Gisi Fleischmann

Despite multiple opportunities to flee to Palestine, Gisi Fischer Feischmann chose to work within the system in Nazi-held Europe to save as many Jews as she could.

Paulette Weil Oppert Fink

Paulette Weill Oppert Fink joined the French Resistance to fight the Nazis, but her work to save refugees didn’t end with the war.

Ida Fink

At a time when Holocaust narratives were expected to be epic tragedies, Ida Landau Fink’s fiction remembered and reimagined the Holocaust with unusual subtlety.

Recha Freier

Recha Schweitzer Freier founded Youth Aliyah in Berlin in 1932, saving thousands of Jews from the Holocaust.

Women’s Rights are Human Rights

If anyone has an indelible sparkle, it’s women’s rights activist and French politician Simone Veil. Although she’s not a household name in the United States, she’s regarded with unwavering praise and awe in France, her home country. 

Doris Zelinsky

While Doris Zelinsky has spent her professional career in the food industry, the work closest to her heart has been preserving the memory of the Holocaust.

Yedida Kanfer

Yedida Kanfer serves as the Coordinator of Education Services at the JFCS Holocaust Center, where she teaches high school students, educators, and the larger community about the Holocaust and patterns of genocide.  She also manages the Tauber Holocaust Library.  Prior to her position at the JFCS Holocaust Center, Yedida served as a research scholar at the Woodrow Wilson International Center for Scholars, and worked for the United States Holocaust Memorial Museum (USHMM) in Washington, DC.  Yedida received her PhD in East European and Jewish history from Yale University in 2011; she was awarded a Fulbright Fellowship (Russia) and a Memorial Foundation for Jewish Culture Doctoral Fellowship.  Having studied Russian, Polish, Hebrew, and German languages for research purposes, her favorite language is Yiddish, which she reads and speaks fluently.

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How to cite this page

Jewish Women's Archive. "Holocaust." (Viewed on March 22, 2019) <https://jwa.org/topics/holocaust>.

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