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Holocaust

Gisi Fleischmann

Despite multiple opportunities to flee to Palestine, Gisi Fischer Feischmann chose to work within the system in Nazi-held Europe to save as many Jews as she could.

Paulette Weil Oppert Fink

Paulette Weill Oppert Fink joined the French Resistance to fight the Nazis, but her work to save refugees didn’t end with the war.

Ida Fink

At a time when Holocaust narratives were expected to be epic tragedies, Ida Landau Fink’s fiction remembered and reimagined the Holocaust with unusual subtlety.

Recha Freier

Recha Schweitzer Freier founded Youth Aliyah in Berlin in 1932, saving thousands of Jews from the Holocaust.

Doris Zelinsky

While Doris Zelinsky has spent her professional career in the food industry, the work closest to her heart has been preserving the memory of the Holocaust.

Golda Ginsburg Krolik

Golda Ginsburg Krolik fought to improve human rights thoughout the twentieth century, from helping the poor to rescuing Holocaust survivors to offering equal opportunities to African Americans.

Emma Lazaroff Schaver

Opera singer Emma Lazaroff Schaver was profoundly affected by giving concerts to Holocaust survivors in displaced persons camps, an experience that shaped the rest of her life.

Walking in the Footsteps of Regina Jonas

by Gail Reimer

Walking out the door of my hotel room on the first day of my first trip to Berlin, (a trip I had determinedly avoided for many years), I was on guard and immediately caught off guard. As I entered the Hackescher Market just steps from the hotel, I found myself face to face with a large size portrait of Regina Jonas on a kiosk that also detailed her story. What was Rabbiner Jonas doing here? Why here? Why now?

Remembering Rabbi Regina Jonas

by Rabbi Sally J. Priesand

I decided I wanted to be a rabbi when I was sixteen years old. At that time, I had never heard of Regina Jonas. I was well into my rabbinic training before one of my professors mentioned her to me. He knew her personally, having attended the same academic institution in Germany. I discovered, however, that very little had been written about her and that basically her story had been lost, as was the case for so many other women in the Jewish community whose stories were hidden away.

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How to cite this page

Jewish Women's Archive. "Holocaust." (Viewed on January 19, 2017) <https://jwa.org/topics/holocaust>.

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