Food

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Cabbage Strudel

Eating Jewish: Savory cabbage strudel

Katherine Romanow

As far as underrated vegetables go, cabbage is near the top of the list. People generally don't rhapsodize over cabbage like they do for fresh sweet corn or a juicy red tomato.

Topics: Food, Recipes, Sukkot
Iraqi Almond Milk

Eating Jewish: Breaking fast with Iraqi almond milk

Katherine Romanow

For most of us, the break fast meal following Yom Kippur evokes images of bagels and cream cheese, coffee cake, blintzes and noodle kugel.

Topics: Food, Recipes, Yom Kippur
Sephardic Fish with Tomato Sauce

Eating Jewish: Get ready to fast with Sephardic fish in tomato sauce

Katherine Romanow

Even before Rosh Hashanah was over this year, my mind turned to what I should make for Yom Kippur.

Topics: Food, Recipes, Yom Kippur
Rosh Hashanah Chicken with Cinnamon and Apples

Eating Jewish: Rosh Hashanah Chicken with Cinnamon and Apples from Metz

Katherine Romanow

Apples are a central component on Rosh Hashanah tables, from the honey dipped apples eaten at the beginning of the evening meal in the hope that they will help bring about a good and sweet new year, to the apple cake eaten at the end of a meal. Thinking about all the apple-eating that happens on this holiday, I couldn’t help but notice that more often than not apples are used in the dishes that grace the dessert table. However, while flipping through Joan Nathan’s latest cookbook Quiches, Kugels, and Couscous (I think this is definitely one of my favorite cookbooks at the moment) my assumptions about apples and desserts were dispelled when I saw the recipe for Rosh Hashanah Chicken with Cinnamon and Apples from Metz. I got extremely excited about this dish and I knew that I had to make it seeing as apples don’t often make it into the savory dishes that I cook.

Etta King and Her Mom, Yael

Righteously bouncing back: What baking challah means to me

Etta King Heisler

The first thing you should know about making challah is this: DO NOT BE AFRAID! I find that many people are intimidated by the thought of making their own challah.

Apple Granita

Eating Jewish: Apple cake - New twists on an old classic

Katherine Romanow

Feasting is a central component to the celebrations of many, if not most, of the holidays on the Jewish calendar.

Kreplach

A kreplach recipe that's worth the work

Preeva Tramiel

I made my first batch of kreplach, noodle dough containing ground meat usually found in chicken soup, in 1972, with my very Greek friend Mary Mastrogeannes, when I was fourteen.

Moroccan Swiss Chard Salad (Salade de Blettes)

Eating Jewish: North African salads for Rosh Hashanah

Katherine Romanow

Not only is it almost the beginning of a new year, but the weather is beginning to change and the tomatoes, zucchini and corn that have been so plentiful over the summer are being replaced by squash, apples, pears, figs and a multitude of other autumn fruits and vegetables. The availability of all this fantastic produce has made the High Holidays one of my favorite times on the Jewish calendar to be cooking. This is especially true for Rosh Hashanah, when the food symbolism of the holiday necessitates the use of seasonal fruits and vegetables.

Dill Pickles

Eating Jewish: Pickling Dill Pickles

Katherine Romanow

The idea for this post came as I was reading Jane Ziegelman’s fascinating book 97 Orchard: An Edible History of Five Immigrant Families in One New York Tenement.

Mengedarrah

Eating Jewish: Mengedarrah for Tisha B’Av

Katherine Romanow

I wanted to write an Eating Jewish post about Tisha b’Av, yet as I started looking through my various cookbooks, I noticed that most of them had no mention of the holiday. It was often missing from the index and even recipes containing ingredients that would usually be included in a dish prepared on Tisha b'Av had no mention of it. I did find mention of Tisha b’Av in Gil Marks' Encyclopedia of Jewish Food, which devotes an entry to it (there’s a reason I’m constantly referring to this book) as well as in his cookbook The World of Jewish Food.

Bejma (Tunisian Shabbat Bread)

Eating Jewish: Shabbat bread done differently

Katherine Romanow

When I think of Shabbat dinner, one of the first things that comes to mind is the sweet, dense challah that I love so much. It has become so popular that it can be purchased in bakeries all week long, and like many of the iconic Jewish foods of North America (bagels, knishes, pastrami, and smoked meat, to name a few) it was introduced by members of the European Jewish community.

Tillie Lewis: More than just about tomatoes

Katherine Romanow

One of the ingredients that is a staple in my kitchen cupboard is canned tomatoes. I will almost always have a can or two around in case I decide I want to make a quick tomato sauce or a pizza, and I especially rely on them throughout the majority of the year when local tomatoes are unavailable. Yet I recently realized that throughout the process of buying, using and consuming these tomatoes, I never stopped to think about their history and how they came to be the product we know today.

Sutlach (Aromatic Milk Pudding)

Eating Jewish: Sutlach (Aromatic Milk Pudding)

Katherine Romanow

It was a busy weekend here for me in Montreal.

Topics: Food, Recipes, Shavuot

In defense of Jewish food

Katherine Romanow

It was just over a week ago that my advisor told me about Josh Ozserky’s article entitled "The Kugel Conundrum" in which Ozserky bluntly declares, “Jewish food is awful.” My first reaction was one of incredulity and I wondered whether a convincing argument could be made against Jewish food.

Topics: Food, Journalism
Schnitzel

Eating Jewish: Schnitzel

Katherine Romanow

When you ask people to think of Israeli food, more often than not, images of crispy brown falafel will dance before their eyes. Yet, when speaking of quintessential Israeli dishes, falafel does not stand alone. Another dish that is central to the culinary landscape of Israel is schnitzel.

Topics: Food, Recipes, Israel
Mufleta

Eating Jewish: Mufleta - Breaking Passover the Moroccan way

Katherine Romanow

The way in which people choose to break Passover varies enormously and that first taste of chametz can be the non-traditional, but ever popular sushi, or something more rooted in Jewish culinary history like bagels. However, the Moroccan Jewish community ends Passover with a distinctive celebration known as the Mimouna.

Topics: Food, Recipes, Passover
Matzah Toffee Bark

Matzah Toffee Bark

Claire

So you've spent a week eating matzah with anything you can think of (I have personally eaten it so far with various nut butters, tuna salad, charoset, and jam).

Topics: Food, Recipes, Passover
Matzah Pie

Eating Jewish: Scacchi (Italian Matzah Pie)

Katherine Romanow

When Passover rolls around, many people bemoan having to eat matzah with only a minority of people actually professing to liking it.

Topics: Food, Recipes, Passover
Halibut and Salmon Terrine

Eating Jewish: A new twist on Gefilte Fish: Halibut and Salmon Terrine

Katherine Romanow

Gefilte fish, these two words make a lot of people turn their noses up in disgust while it can make others salivate.

Topics: Food, Recipes, Passover
Gluten-free Lemon Passover Cupcakes

Gluten-free Lemon Passover Cupcakes with Blackberry Jam and Lemon Glaze

Claire

This cake is not just for Passover, friends. And it's not even just for the Jews. I'm convinced that this is one that everyone will like.

Topics: Food, Recipes, Passover
Aranygaluska or "Hungarian Monkey Bread"

Eating Jewish: Aranygaluska, or "Hungarian monkey bread"

Katherine Romanow

Earlier this month, The Jew and the Carrot published an article by Leah Koenig entitled “Jewish Dishes We Miss: A Top-10 List of Ashkenazi Foods To Bring Back.” Prior to publishing this list, readers were asked to write in with their own suggestions as to which dishes should go on this list and in the end it was made up of the following ten dishes: schmaltz (rendered poultry fat), gribenes (poultry skin cracklings), schav (sorrel and sorrel soup), tongue, mamaliga (cornmeal porridge), russel (fermented beets), eyerlekh (unhatched eggs), belly lox, p’tcha (jellied calf’s foot), and aranygaluska (pull apart cake). I could write blog posts about each of these dishes (admittedly some are more appealing than others) but the one that caught my attention was aranygaluska. The name wasn’t familiar but as soon as I started reading its description I immediately realized that I knew this dessert of cinnamon and sugar covered yeast dough balls, under the guise of monkey bread. This revelation immediately sent me to my stacks of cookbooks and to the Internet to find out why I knew this Hungarian Jewish dessert under another name.

Topics: Food, Recipes
Oznei Haman

Eating Jewish: Oznei Haman (Haman’s Ears)

Katherine Romanow

There are many Purim sweets that are modeled after Haman's anatomy or clothing.

Topics: Food, Recipes, Purim
Sambusak el Tawa (Iraqi Chickpea Turnovers)

Eating Jewish: Iraqi Purim Delicacies

Katherine Romanow

With preparation for Purim in full swing, there is no doubt that many people are thinking about Hamantaschen, which has become synonymous with this holiday in North America.

Topics: Food, Recipes, Purim
Gluten-free Bakery Style Hamantaschen

Gluten-free bakery style hamantaschen

Claire

These were my first Hamantaschen. What is a Hamantaschen, you might wonder? These cookies are little three-cornered wonders that puff up into bite-size pastries filled with any number of things, including jam, chocolate hazelnut spread, nuts, dates, and perhaps most commonly, poppy seed filling or prunes. Their triangular shape is sometimes called evocative of the ears of the villain of the holiday of Purim - you guessed it - Haman, who is defeated in the story as told in the Book of Esther.

Topics: Food, Recipes, Purim
Striped Hamantaschen

Rolling in Dough

Preeva Tramiel

My congregation is having a big Purim Party on Sunday. They will need about 300 hamantaschen and I am bringing enough dough to make 2/3 of them.

Topics: Food, Recipes, Purim
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