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Fiction

Sonia Levitin

Sonia Levitin mined both her personal history and major historical events for her award–winning books for children and young adults.

Elma Ehrlich Levinger

Elma Ehrlich Levinger helped strengthen the Jewish community through her leadership of Jewish women’s organizations, but her books for children and adults may have had an even greater impact on American Jews.

Blume Lempel

Told repeatedly from an early age that girls were not worth educating and that uneducated people couldn’t be writers, Blume Lempel defied expectations to write beautiful, unusually modernist Yiddish literature.

Malka Lee

Malka Lee’s lyrical Yiddish poems won over both critics and general American Jewish audiences, but it was her work dedicated to the family she lost in the Holocaust that had the most lasting impact.

Gerda Weissmann Klein

Gerda Weissmann Klein used her experiences in the Holocaust to write children’s books that helped children grapple with difficult subjects.

Sue Kaufman

Sue Kaufman’s 1967 breakout novel, Diary of a Mad Housewife, earned her a reputation for writing subtly brutal novels about the isolation and frustration of city life.

Lyalya Kaufman

The daughter of the acclaimed writer Sholom Aleichem and the mother of celebrated novelist Bel Kaufman, Lyalya Kaufman was revered in her own right for her thousands of vignettes and short stories in Yiddish.

Beatrice Kaufman

A member of the famed Algonquin Round Table, Beatrice Kaufman made an impact on the American literary scene both for publishing important modernist writers and for writing her own subversively feminist stories and plays.

Miriam Karpilove

Miriam Karpilove’s wildly popular Yiddish stories explored the tensions and frustrations Jewish women faced at the turn of the century—the desire for secular education, the hunger to participate in a wider culture, and the hardships of immigration.

Judith Krantz

A hypercritical professor kept Judith Krantz from writing fiction until middle age, but once she started, her bestselling romance novels proved him wrong.

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How to cite this page

Jewish Women's Archive. "Fiction." (Viewed on January 17, 2017) <https://jwa.org/topics/fiction>.

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