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Fiction

Bel Kaufman

Bel Kaufman, best known for her novel Up the Down Staircase and its subsequent film, was born in Berlin, Germany, on May 10, 1911. She is the granddaughter of the great Yiddish writer Sholem Aleichem (on whose work the musical Fiddler on the Roof is based).

Miriam Karpilove

Miriam Karpilove was one of the most prolific and widely published women writers of Yiddish prose. Her short stories and novels explore issues important in the lives of Jewish women of her generation. Frequent themes are the upbringing of girls and women in Eastern Europe, the barriers they encounter when they seek secular education, and the conflicts they experience upon immigration to North America.

Beatrice Kaufman

Regarded as one of the wittiest women in New York during the 1930s and 1940s, Beatrice Kaufman edited important works of modernist poetry and fiction, published short stories of her own in the New Yorker, and saw several of her plays produced on Broadway.

Ilona Karmel

Ilona Karmel transformed details of her experiences as a Polish-Jewish prisoner in Nazi work camps and as a patient undergoing a prolonged convalescence into two compelling and memorable novels.

Amalia Kahana-Carmon

The recipient of many prestigious literary prizes, the “darling” of Israeli academe and the subject of several scholarly Hebrew monographs, Kahana-Carmon’s central place in Israeli literature was formally recognized in 2000, when she was awarded the coveted Israel Prize.

Helen Joseph

An internationally renowned puppeteer and author on marionettes, Helen Haiman Joseph made a career entertaining and educating audiences of all ages with the performance of puppetry.

Ruth Prawer Jhabvala

To many of her readers, Ruth Prawer Jhabvala is equated with the silks and spices of Heat and Dust (1975). In appending her husband’s even more exotic name, she has been able to overshadow her own alien origins and her Jewish descent is a surprisingly little known fact, especially in India, where it is enough that she is a westerner in Delhi, presuming to comment on Indian country and culture.

Paula Jacques

Paula Jacques is the pen name of Paula Abadi (b. Cairo, May 8, 1949). Since 1975 a talk show hostess on the French radio networks France Culture and France Inter, she is also a novelist, many of whose books achieve second editions as paperbacks. Paula Jacques’s work reconstructs the life of the mostly French-speaking Egyptian Jewish community prior to their expulsion at the time of the Suez crisis.

Rebekah Gumpert Hyneman

Rebekah Gumpert Hyneman was best known to mid-nineteenth-century American Jews as the author of The Leper and Other Poems (1853). However, she also published stories, poems, and essays in the Occident and American Jewish Advocate, the Masonic Keystone and Mirror, and other periodicals.

Barbara Honigmann

Barbara Honigmann, who was born in East Berlin on February 12, 1949, is the most distinguished German-Jewish writer of the generations born after the Holocaust. Her father, Georg Honigmann, Ph.D. (1903–1984), who was born in Wiesbaden, Germany, emigrated to Great Britain in 1933 but later returned to the GDR, where he was a prominent journalist and film producer. Her mother, Alice (née Kohlmann, 1910–1984), was born in Vienna and emigrated to Great Britain in 1934. She worked in film dubbing. The couple divorced in 1954.

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How to cite this page

Jewish Women's Archive. "Fiction." (Viewed on February 23, 2017) <https://jwa.org/topics/fiction>.

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