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Fiction

Rokhl Häring Korn

Rokhl Häring Korn is a major figure in modern Yiddish literature. Her early work established her reputation as a brilliant narrative writer in verse and prose and a passionate lyric poet. In her later work she developed into a poet of complex, sustained meditation, with a remarkable ability to turn her life into symbol. In the course of her writing career she published eight volumes of poetry and two collections of fiction.

Gertrud Kolmar

In a letter of July 1941, Gertrud Kolmar writes to her sister Hilde: “I am a poet, yes, that much I know; but I never want to be a writer.” The German-Jewish author considered poetry a more spiritual and superior form of writing that allowed for a revelation of spiritual beliefs and personal growth.

Edith Konecky

Edith Konecky, despite a small body of work, can lay claim to a large literary achievement with Allegra Maud Goldman (1976), a coming-of-age novel that chronicles the growth of a young female artist. In brilliantly comic, deceptively simple vignettes, Konecky depicts the world of a nouveau riche Jewish American family in the early part of the twentieth century.

Francine Klagsbrun

Author of more than a dozen books and countless articles in national publications, and a regular columnist in two Jewish publications, Francine Klagsbrun is a writer of protean interests. She has succeeded in making an impact on both American and American Jewish culture.

Rashel Mironovna Khin

Given her role in late-nineteenth century Russian society, Rashel Mironovna Khin might be cast as Eastern Europe’s “salon Jewess.” Like her counterparts in the West—Rahel Varnhagen, Dorothea Mendelssohn Schlegel and others of eighteenth-century Berlin—Khin presided over a coterie of women and men, Jews and gentiles, gathered together for a social and intellectual event.

Lyalya Kaufman

Although her earliest writings for the Forverts were translated from Russian to Yiddish by Dina Blond-Mikhelovitch, Lyalya Kaufman wrote most of her over two thousand sketches and short stories in Yiddish herself. Up until her death in 1964, Kaufman, the eldest daughter of Sholem Aleichem, was the only one of his six children who pursued a literary career.

Sue Kaufman

Sue Kaufman railed against “having my work held up against a yardstick, measuring whether I am or am not writing about women’s issues.” Her resentment is well founded, for Sue Kaufman wrote about people’s issues, most specifically modern urbanites who struggled with the stresses of city life which, like ancient water torture, relentlessly wore them down.

Bel Kaufman

Bel Kaufman, best known for her novel Up the Down Staircase and its subsequent film, was born in Berlin, Germany, on May 10, 1911. She is the granddaughter of the great Yiddish writer Sholem Aleichem (on whose work the musical Fiddler on the Roof is based).

Miriam Karpilove

Miriam Karpilove was one of the most prolific and widely published women writers of Yiddish prose. Her short stories and novels explore issues important in the lives of Jewish women of her generation. Frequent themes are the upbringing of girls and women in Eastern Europe, the barriers they encounter when they seek secular education, and the conflicts they experience upon immigration to North America.

Beatrice Kaufman

Regarded as one of the wittiest women in New York during the 1930s and 1940s, Beatrice Kaufman edited important works of modernist poetry and fiction, published short stories of her own in the New Yorker, and saw several of her plays produced on Broadway.

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How to cite this page

Jewish Women's Archive. "Fiction." (Viewed on January 16, 2017) <https://jwa.org/topics/fiction>.

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