Entrepreneurs

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Frieda Barkin Hennock

The first woman ever appointed to the Federal Communications Commission, Frieda Barkin Hennock argued that women had a disproportionate stake in the media and helped establish public broadcasting.

Sylvia Hassenfeld

Sylvia Hassenfeld led the American Jewish Joint Distribution Committee (JDC) through the humanitarian crisis of the Soviet Union’s collapse and the massive airlift of Ethiopian Jews.

Edith Gregor Halpert

Edith Gregor Halpert helped influence American artistic tastes through her galleries championing both modern and folk art.

Jean Gordon

Already a successful businesswoman who had created a popular textile company, Jean Gordon launched a remarkable second career as the owner and publisher of Dance Magazine.

Hattie Carnegie

Hattie Carnegie was a leader in American fashion for three decades, designing clothes with a blend of simplicity and elegance.

Claire Bodner

Despite having almost no training in either fashion or business, Claire Bodner ran a successful fashion design company that was featured in the top magazines and stores in the country.

Beatrice Berler

Beatrice Berler went back to school at age 45, becoming an award-winning translator of Spanish novels and history as well as an activist for adult literacy.

Adrien Arpel

Adrien Arpel started her own business two days out of high school, becoming a leader in the field of cosmetics for her innovations in department store makeovers and her belief that women needed knowledgeable advice tailored to their needs.

Estelle Joan Sommers

Estelle Joan Sommers channeled her passion for dance into her innovative designs for Capezio’s dance and exercise clothing and her savvy management of its businesses.

Ruth Light Braun

Ruth Light Braun captured the lived experience of Jews in New York and Palestine through her artwork in charcoal and conte crayon.

Glückel of Hameln

Glückel bas Judah of Hameln’s remarkable life as a businesswoman and world traveler was preserved in her own words, thanks to the autobiography she wrote over the course of several years.

Ida Cohen Rosenthal

Ida Cohen Rosenthal not only created the modern bra, she helped found Maidenform, Inc. and make it the most successful bra manufacturer in the world.

Rosanna Dyer Osterman

Rosanna Dyer Osterman’s supplies helped travelers explore the western frontier, but it was her life-saving efforts as a nurse for which she was best remembered.

Carmel Myers

Carmel Myers acted in over seventy films and led a production company that packaged TV and radio shows, but her most lasting contribution to Hollywood may have been her popularization of the idea of A-list and B-list celebrities.

Regina Margareten

Regina Margareten was hailed as the “Matzah Queen” and the “matriarch of the kosher food industry” for both her business sense and her innovations to improve the quality of her products.

Sadie Loewith

Sadie Loewith was thirty years old before she was allowed to vote, but took on leadership roles in business and local government and fought to ensure other women could do the same.

Nancy Lieberman

Hailed as one of the greats of women’s basketball, Nancy Lieberman set a record as the youngest Olympic medalist in basketball and was inducted into multiple sports halls of fame.

Judith Leiber

Judith Leiber carved a unique place for herself in the world of fashion as the designer of some of the most inventive and sought-after handbags in the world.

Ruth Mosko Handler

Ruth Mosko Handler is best known as the inventor of the Barbie doll, but her most important work may be her prosthetics for survivors of breast cancer.

Jennie Grossinger

Jennie Grossinger became the driving force behind the famed Catskills resort referred to as “Waldorf on the Hudson.”

Sonia Delaunay

Through her art and work, Sonia Delaunay blurred the lines between poetry, fashion, and fine art.

Beatrice Fox Auerbach

Beatrice Fox Auerbach ran her family’s department store, G. Fox and Company, for thirty years, introducing innovations to customer service and helping women and minorities climb the corporate ladder.

Polly Adler

Notorious for her connections with gangsters at the height of Prohibition, Polly Adler fought to become “the best goddam madam in all America.”

Anna Marks

Anna Rich Marks was born in Russian-occupied Poland in 1847. Raised in poverty and haunted by the constant threat of pogroms, she left Poland and traveled to England where she met and married Wolff Marks in 1862, at age fifteen. The couple ventured to America, eventually settling in Eureka City, a rich mining area sixty miles south of Salt Lake City. Anna Marks made her fortune in real estate. She owned controlling interests in two mines near Eureka and was known to have invested money in diamonds as well. Anna Marks died of a heart attack in Eureka City on April 19, 1912.

Betty Spiegelberg

Levi Spiegelberg followed his brother Solomon to Santa Fe, New Mexico in 1848. Together they formed the partnership of Spiegelberg Brothers, an extremely successful merchant enterprise. Like many pioneer Jewish men, Levi wished to marry within his faith. Those who could afford the expense, often returned to Europe to find a Jewish bride. Betty married Levi in 1848. She arrived in Santa Fe, New Mexico in the early 1860's after taking the railroad to the end of the Missouri and then traveling up the steep Santa Fe Tail by ox train.

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