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Economics

Gertrude Himmelfarb

Gertrude Himmelfarb railed against the moral relativism and social-science-based work of the “New Historians” and argued for a return to the values of the Victorian era.

Barbara Boxer

Barbara Boxer earned a reputation as a powerful voice for liberal causes by leading the charge on issues like sexual harassment, the Iraq War, and marriage equality.

Ruth Messinger

As a politician, Ruth Messinger served her community, but in leading American Jewish World Service, she has found ways for her community to help repair the world.

How Poverty Became a Women’s Issue

Fifty years ago, President Lyndon Johnson declared a War on Poverty, a government response to a national poverty rate around 19%. Back then, the face of poverty in the States was those living in inner-city projects or Appalachian shacks. Today the face of poverty is women.

According to Maria Shriver (on the Atlantic), of the more 100 million Americans living close to or under the poverty line, nearly 70% are women and children. Forget having it all; these women just want to be able to feed their kids and pay their electric bill.

Reality check: Wage gap for Jewish professionals worse than national average

Much to the dismay of a number of Jewish organizations, the Senate neglected to vote on the Paycheck Fairness Act last month, effectively shelving it for the foreseeable future. The bill, which would have augmented current civil rights law to protect against sex-based pay discrimination, had received broad support from civil rights and women’s rights groups but faced opposition from business organizations, whose members said it would be both difficult and expensive to enforce.

Mollie Orshansky, 1915 - 2006

Mollie Orshansky was my good friend and esteemed colleague at the Social Security Administration where we both worked. Over the course of her long life – she lived until the age of 91 – Mollie was very smart, independent, and a hardworking government employee. She was called Miss Poverty because she developed the poverty index widely used by the Federal government as a basis for benefit programs involving low income individuals and families.

Mazel Tov, Heather Booth!

Yesterday Heather Booth, Director of Americans for Financial Reform, wrote a piece in the Huffington Post called V-I-C-T-O-R-Y!!! lauding Congress for passing the most significant financial reform legislation since the Great Depression.

Linda Lingle elected Governor of Hawaii

November 5, 2002

Linda Lingle became the first female and first Jew to be elected Governor in the state of Hawaii.

Bella Abzug elected to Congress

November 3, 1970

Elected to the U.S. Congress on this date, Bella Abzug claimed that she spent her days "figuring out how to beat the machine and knock the crap out of the political power structure."

Stereotypes in the United States

The process of projecting ideas and fantasies is called stereotyping. Scholars have repeatedly demonstrated that stereotypes, in fact, have more to teach about the “stereotyper” than the “stereotyped.” In relations between minorities and majorities, particularly when a dominant group suppresses and limits another, those stereotypes play a crucial role in rationalizing the rights of the powerful over the powerless and in justifying why a group is despised.

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How to cite this page

Jewish Women's Archive. "Economics." (Viewed on December 16, 2017) <https://jwa.org/topics/economics>.

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