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Dance

Estelle Joan Sommers

Estelle Joan Sommers channeled her passion for dance into her innovative designs for Capezio’s dance and exercise clothing and her savvy management of its businesses.

Sophie Maslow

Sophie Maslow blended classical, modern, and folk traditions in her dance and choreography and drew inspiration from politics and modern folk music to create vibrant new pieces that engaged audiences in new ways.

Shari Lewis

Shari Lewis won twelve Emmy awards for her children’s programming which featured puppets on variety shows and children’s shows, including Lamb Chop’s Play-Along.

Pearl Lang

Pearl Lang was the first dancer Martha Graham allowed to perform some of her roles, and brought elements of the ecstatic poetry and dance of Hasidic and Sephardic Jewish traditions to her own critically praised work as a dancer and choreographer.

Melissa Hayden

Melissa Hayden showed unparalleled versatility and range in her ballet dancing, prompting choreographers to create roles specifically for her during a career that spanned decades at the top of her profession.

Goldie Hawn

As an actress, Goldie Hawn became known for playing dumb blondes, but behind the camera, she was determined to fulfill her vision as an executive producer and director.

Anna Halprin

Anna Halprin was one of the founders of postmodern dance, but her focus has been on dance as a healing art, creating companies for dancers living with HIV and AIDS.

Selma Jeanne Cohen

Selma Jeanne Cohen transformed the field of dance by giving critics and historians the language to discuss the nuances of performance and choreography.

Anna Sokolow

Anna Sokolow pushed the boundaries of modern dance, using her performances to explore important social issues and the darkest human emotions.

Discovering the Art of Prayer

Adults may scoff, and my friends may hypocritically mock me, but I can never deny that I would want to stand out in a crowd. Whether a college application, a creative thesis for school, or even the food that I bring for lunch, I want to discover a personal uniqueness that I carry so I can have some special pride in my stride. Luckily for me, I can already claim an artistic and spiritual individuality that I bring to the table as a female Jew.

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How to cite this page

Jewish Women's Archive. "Dance." (Viewed on December 12, 2017) <https://jwa.org/topics/dance>.

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