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Civil Rights

Birth of Caroline Klein Simon, anti-discrimination pioneer

November 12, 1900

Birth of Caroline Klein Simon, public activist and pioneer in the fight for women's and human rights.

Ernestine Rose presides over national women's rights convention

October 19, 1854

Ernestine Rose, a leading early American advocate for women's rights, presided over the Fifth National Woman's Rights Convention in Philadelphia.

Esther Lederer becomes Ann Landers

October 16, 1955

Esther Lederer, better known as "Ann Landers," published her first advice column.

First North Carolinian graduates from Smith College

June 18, 1901

Suffragist Gertrude Weil became the first North Carolinian to graduate from Smith College.

Carol Gilligan publishes "In a Different Voice"

May 24, 1982

Psychologist Carol Gilligan published "In a Different Voice," the first book to argue that women's psychological development could not be understood by studying men.

Poet Muriel Rukeyser receives important literary award

May 8, 1942

In winning an award from the National Institute of Arts and Letters and the American Academy of Arts and Letters, the young poet was recognized as an important presence on the American literary scene.

Labor leaders announce their engagement at May Day Parade

May 1, 1916

Labor leaders Bessie Abramowitz and Sidney Hillman announced their engagement while leading the clothing workers' contingent in the Chicago May Day Parade.

Suffragist and anti-slavery activist Ernestine Rose addresses annual Thomas Paine dinner

January 29, 1848

Suffragist and anti-slavery activist Ernestine Rose addressed the annual Thomas Paine dinner, declaring, "superstition keeps women ignorant, dependent, and enslaved beings. Knowledge will make them free."

Lillian D. Wald

Lillian Wald began her work in 1893, when she discovered the need for health care among New York’s largely Jewish immigrant population. Her solution to this problem, in the form of public health nursing—a term she coined—served only as the beginning of her life’s work, which was dedicated to providing health care, education and social services to the poor and immigrant members of her Henry Street Settlement, and beyond.

Edith Rosenwald Stern

Edith Rosenwald Stern, philanthropist, community leader, and civil rights activist left a legacy of commitment to social justice. With the same passion and strategy, she led the Jewish community in its philanthropy, encouraged her grandchildren to pursue their own charitable interests, and strongly supported Israel.

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How to cite this page

Jewish Women's Archive. "Civil Rights." (Viewed on September 21, 2018) <https://jwa.org/topics/civil-rights>.

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