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Children

Margaret Naumburg

Margaret Naumburg founded the Walden School and authored many works on psychology and art therapy.

Eva Violet Mond Isaacs, Second Marchioness of Reading

Lady Eva Violet Mond Isaacs, née Melchett, Marchioness of Reading, was born into one remarkable family and married into another. She occupied a unique place in Anglo-Jewry; as Vice President of the World Jewish Congress and President of its British section she was an eloquent and vocal supporter of the Zionist cause and the young state of Israel.

Eve Merriam

The tactility and fertility of language, its joys and journeys, are the stuff of Eve Merriam’s more than fifty books of poems for children. “Eat a poem,” she urged her readers and listeners (for her, poetry was to be “out loud”). “Don’t be polite. / Bite in. / Pick it up with your fingers and lick the juice that may run down your chin.”

Medieval Ashkenaz (1096-1348)

The Jewish communities of Northern France and of Germany who constituted Medieval Ashkenaz were situated along the trade routes of the time. These communities were well known for their prominent and accomplished scholars as well as their flourishing businesses. These Jewish communities flourished during the High and Late Middle Ages (1050–1450) as urban centers grew and thrived and centers of Jewish learning expanded.

Minnie Dessau Louis

Minnie Dessau Louis was one of the most active and important Jewish communal workers on the American scene from the 1880s through the early 1900s. Born in Philadelphia on June 21, 1841, the second daughter of Fannie (Zachariah) and Abraham Dessau, Minnie moved to Georgia with her family when she was four months old. She returned north to attend Brooklyn’s Packer Collegiate Institute in 1857 and 1858, and in 1866 married businessman Adolph H. Louis.

Fannie Eller Lorber

Fannie Eller Lorber was Denver’s twentieth-century “friend of children.” The Colorado philanthropist worked on behalf of Jewish children suffering from the devastating effects of lung disease, believing that “the cause of a child is the cause of humanity.” Lorber epitomized the volunteer spirit of urban Jewish women in the American West, where established institutions for the poor and infirm were scarce. She founded the Denver Jewish Sheltering Home for the children of tuberculosis patients in 1907, and remained its president and chief fund-raiser for over fifty years. Later renamed the National Home for Jewish Children (NHJC), the institution merged with the National Jewish Hospital in 1978, and it remains a world-class medical and educational facility. Thousands of the NHJC’s “alumni” are the living legacy of Fannie Lorber and Jewish female philanthropy during the Progressive Era.

Myra Cohn Livingston

Myra Cohn Livingston, poet, musician, critic, educator, anthologist and author, respected the true craft of writing poetry. She experimented with form, never compromising, and was noted for using a variety of techniques to express the realities and wonders of a child’s everyday world and experiences. By passing along her standards and sharing her expertise during over twenty years of teaching at the University of California at Los Angeles, she also brought numerous new talents into the field of children’s literature.

Shari Lewis

Shari Lewis was a ventriloquist, symphony conductor, author, producer, and performer. She and her puppet friends won numerous awards. She was asked by former first ladies Nancy Reagan and Rosalyn Carter to be the sole performer at the annual White House Christmas party for the children of the Diplomatic Corps, and she emceed the annual White House Easter festival for the Bushes and the Clintons.

Sonia Levitin

Whether Sonia Levitin is writing picture books, mysteries, humor, historical adventures or Young Adult novels dealing with the struggle of young people to find freedom and meaning in their lives, she says “I’ve come to realize I am always writing my own life story, blending personal experience with research and, of course, imagination...I write for young people because I remember my own youth so well.”

Elma Ehrlich Levinger

Active in an array of Jewish women’s and youth organizations, Elma Ehrlich Levinger was also the author of over thirty books for children and several for adults—all of which emphasize the importance of maintaining Jewish identity in America. Levinger used both drama and the short story as a means of educating young people and women about Jewish history and traditions, hoping to encourage them to participate in Jewish social life.

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How to cite this page

Jewish Women's Archive. "Children." (Viewed on June 25, 2018) <https://jwa.org/topics/children>.

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