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Art

Florence Nightingale Levy

Florence Nightingale Levy’s most significant achievement was the founding of the American Art Annual in 1898. A comprehensive directory of the American art world, the Annual catalogued schools, associations, exhibitions, and artists nationwide. Levy went on to perform invaluable editing, organizing, and educational roles in the American art world for the next fifty years.

Ewa Kuryluk

An author, writer, essayist and art historian, Ewa Kuryluk was born in Cracow, Poland on May 5, 1946. Her father, Karol, born in 1910 in Zbaraz, Poland (now Ukraine), studied at the University of Lwów. His wife, Maria (née Miriam Kohany), born in Bielsko-Biala (Poland) in 1917, was a writer and translator. In circa 1944 the couple moved from Lwów to Lublin and later to Cracow and Warsaw. A son, Piotr, was born in 1950. Karol Kuryluk was the founder and editor-in-chief (1933–1939) of the magazine Sygnaly and served as minister of culture from 1956 to 1958. In 1959 he became ambassador to Austria, remaining in Vienna until 1964. He died in 1967. His widow died in 2001.

Barbara Kruger

An image like a 1950s advertising poster of a girl looking admiringly at a boy making a muscle is captioned “We don’t need another hero” in red. A woman looking into a shattered mirror is underscored by the jagged headline “You are not yourself.” These works, by artist Barbara Kruger, are not only among the most easily recognizable in American art of the last twenty years, but are also—through their relentless questioning of gender roles, consumer society, and the power of the media—among the most provocative.

Jewish Museums in the United States

Jewish women play prominent roles as founders, directors, curators, artists, and patrons of Jewish museums in the United States. While women have rarely played an exclusive role in the creation of either small community or larger museums, their work as creators and developers of these repositories is critical.

Marilyn Hirsh

“K’tonton existed only on the pages of a book, but I saw him clearly—more clearly—than I saw the teacher.” These are the words written by Francine Klagsbrun, the well-known author, in her introduction to the book The Best of K’tonton, one of the thirty children’s books, primarily of Jewish interest, illustrated by Marilyn Hirsh.

Eva Hesse

Eva Hesse is recognized as one of the most innovative and potent artists to emerge in New York in the fertile 1960s. She created new sculptural forms in such eccentric materials as latex and fiberglass, and has become known for giving minimal art organic, emotional, and kinetic aspects. Her material and formal inventions, with their sensuous and emotional extremes, were balanced by an active verbal intelligence that won her the respect of the art community—as her warmth and wry humor won her many friends.

Edith Gregor Halpert

Art dealer, collector, and influential businesswoman, Edith Halpert changed the way Americans perceive their art. Born in Odessa, [now] Ukraine, on April 25, 1900, she was the daughter of Gregor and Frances (Lucom) Fivoosiovitch. Her father died when she was very young and when she was six years old, her mother brought her and her sister to New York City. While in high school, at age fourteen, Edith took classes at the National Academy of Design after convincing the instructors she was really sixteen.

Irene Rothschild Guggenheim

Irene Rothschild Guggenheim, child welfare advocate and art collector, was born in New York City on December 16, 1868, daughter of Victor Henry and Josephine (Wolf) Rothschild. Her father had come to the United States from the German state of Würtemberg in 1852. During the Civil War, he settled in New York City and opened a manufactory for men’s shirts that later expanded into a thriving men’s and women’s ready-made clothing business. The Rothschilds had five children, three daughters and two sons; Irene was the second daughter.

Peggy Guggenheim

Born Marguerite Guggenheim in New York City to Florence (Seligman) and Benjamin Guggenheim, Peggy Guggenheim amassed what is now considered to be Italy’s most important modern art collection. Her collecting ability was certainly the result of her exposure, at an early age, to the German Jewish emphasis on Kultur. The Seligmans were members of the academic and artistic world. As wealthy German Jewish Americans, opera boxes, grand tours of Europe, and the purchase of priceless paintings characterized their life-style, which certainly influenced Peggy.

Tatyana Grosman

Tatyana Grosman nurtured an entire generation of printmakers and raised printmaking in the United States to the status of a major fine art. Universal Limited Art Editions, which she founded in 1957 at her home in Long Island, New York, published prints by many of the major American artists of her generation and launched collaborative endeavors between artists and writers. Her home became a uniquely fertile environment providing both the tools and the critical encouragement for virtually every type of printmaking.

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How to cite this page

Jewish Women's Archive. "Art." (Viewed on February 23, 2017) <https://jwa.org/topics/art>.

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