Art

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Collection

Edith Gregor Halpert

Edith Gregor Halpert helped influence American artistic tastes through her galleries championing both modern and folk art.

Peggy Guggenheim

Marguerite “Peggy” Guggenheim amassed one of Italy’s most important modern art collections despite the chaos of WWII.

Etta Cone

With her sister Claribel, Etta Cone amassed one of the largest private art collections in the world, becoming a major supporter of artists like Matisse and Picasso.

Claribel Cone

Claribel Cone made contributions to two vastly different fields as a biologist and a patron of modern French art.

Elisheva Cohen

Despite beginning her career late in life, Elisheva Benjamin Cohen became indispensable to the newly created Israel Museum as Chief Curator for the Arts.

Elaine Lustig Cohen

Elaine Lustig Cohen was at the forefront of graphic design and marketing with her modernist combinations of typography and photomontage.

Florence Meyer Blumenthal

Florence Meyer Blumenthal created an arts foundation that funded hundreds of promising artists and allowed them to focus on pursuing their craft.

Aline Bernstein

Aline Bernstein was one of the first theatrical designers in New York to make sets and costumes entirely from scratch and crafted sets with moving parts that could be rearranged.
Olivia Link's Bat Mitzvah

Discovering the Art of Prayer

by  Olivia Link

Adults may scoff, and my friends may hypocritically mock me, but I can never deny that I would want to stand out in a crowd. Whether a college application, a creative thesis for school, or even the food that I bring for lunch, I want to discover a personal uniqueness that I carry so I can have some special pride in my stride. Luckily for me, I can already claim an artistic and spiritual individuality that I bring to the table as a female Jew.

Topics: Feminism, Art, Dance, Prayer

Jeanette Ingberman, founder of Exit Art, is born

January 23, 1952

"You never walked away from a conversation with art curator Jeanette Ingberman without having learned something.”

Beate Sirota Gordon, 1987

Meet Beate Sirota Gordon – Who Knew?

by  Elizabeth Pleck

Beate Sirota Gordon (1923-2012), feminist and Asian arts impressario, was only 22 years old when she wrote women's rights into Japan’s constitution. In her postwar career as a director of performing arts, first for the Japan Society and then the Asia Society in New York City, she introduced Americans to Asian visual and performing arts, from Japanese wood block prints to Burmese music to Vietnamese puppets.

Topics: Women's Rights, Art, Law

Los Angeles’ Woman’s Building remembered

January 15, 2012

In 1973, artist Judy Chicago, graphic designer Sheila Levant de Bretteville, and art historian Arlene Raven set out to find a home in Los Angeles for the Feminist Studio Workshop (FSW), their new independent school for women artists. The space they chose occupied the site of the old Chouinard Art Institute near MacArthur Park.  The Woman’s Building, as they called their new home, was a hotbed of creativity and inspiration for the next 18 years.

Helene Aylon Book Launch, October 10, 2012

Helène Aylon: Artist, Ecofeminist, Author

by  Gabrielle Orcha

The room was filled with an open, excited energy.

Anita Steckel with her Painting "Skyline", 1974

Of Peonies & Penises: Anita Steckel’s Legacy

by  Deborah Fineblum Raub

Anita Steckel was 82 when she died last March. But Anita, her many fans would insist, was way younger than most of us will ever be.

Gyno-Star: Feminist Superhero

Meet Rebecca Cohen and Gyno-Star, the world’s first explicitly feminist superhero

by  Leah Berkenwald

Wonder Woman, created in the 1940s, showed the world that women could kick butt.

Topics: Feminism, Art, Writing
"Self-Portrait (for Graphic Details)" Miss Lasko-Gross, 2010

The Comic Book Diaries

by  Jessica Leader

As part of Yeshiva University Museum’s “Graphic Details – Confessional Comics by Jewish Women” event, I attended the October 24th “Close and Personal: Jewish Women Artists and Their Graphic Diaries” panel at the Center for Jewish History, which featured authors from the exhibition in dialogue about the confessional nature of comic book art. The panelists come from distinct backgrounds: Lauren Weinstein is the lead singer of a metaphysical rock band; Miss Lasko-Gross is creating an iPhone app about religious fundamentalism; Ariel Schrag is a lesbian screenwriter for HBO and Showtime series; and Miriam Katin is a holocaust survivor. Yet these women share a commonality: they are comic book creators with semi-autobiographical stories about coming of age as a Jewish woman.

Topics: Art, Writing
"Miss Etta and Dr. Claribel," by Susan Fillion

Miss Etta and Dr. Claribel: A new look into the lives of the Cone sisters

by  Ellen K. Rothman

Growing up in Baltimore in the 1950s and 60s, we got our doses of high culture at the Baltimore Museum of Art.

Who is Frida Kahlo?

by  Leah Berkenwald

Tomorrow we celebrate the 104th birthday of Frida Kahlo, a Mexican artist known for her striking self-portraits. Kahlo's work was largely influenced by pain after a bus accident left her with permanent disabilities, making her an inspirational figure from a disability point of view.

In 2006, conceptual identity performance artist Maya Escobar (@mayaescobar) created a Youtube video called "el es frida kahlo," below.

Topics: Art, Film

Forget Barbie; Dress Gertrude Stein and Alice B. Toklas Instead

by  Renee Ghert-Zand

Adding to the various portrayals of Gertrude Stein and Alice B. Toklas that are part of San Francisco’s Contemporary Jewish Museum’s current “Seeing Gertrude Stein” exhibit, reviewed recently in the Forward, are a set of paper dolls of the two women.

Topics: Art
"Toys in Babeland," by Vanessa Davis

Graphic Details: Interview with Vanessa Davis

by  Leah Berkenwald

Graphic Details: Confessional Comics by Jewish Women is the first museum exhibit to explore this unique niche of autobiographical storytelling by Jewish women. The touring exhibit, sponsored by The Forward, features the work of 18 Jewish women artists. The Jewish Women's Archive is interviewing each of the artists about their work and their experience as a female, Jewish graphic artist.

Topics: Art, Writing, Memoirs
"The Imposter Daughter" by Laurie Sandell, excerpt page 1

Graphic Details: Interview with Laurie Sandell

by  Leah Berkenwald

Graphic Details: Confessional Comics by Jewish Women is the first museum exhibit to explore this unique niche of autobiographical storytelling by Jewish women. The touring exhibit, sponsored by The Forward, features the work of 18 Jewish women artists. The Jewish Women's Archive is interviewing each of the artists about their work and their experience as a female, Jewish graphic artist.

"Dyke March" by Ariel Schrag, 2005

Graphic Details: Interview with Ariel Schrag

by  Leah Berkenwald

Graphic Details: Confessional Comics by Jewish Women is the first museum exhibit to explore this unique niche of autobiographical storytelling by Jewish women. The touring exhibit, sponsored by The Forward, features the work of 18 Jewish women artists. The Jewish Women's Archive is interviewing each of the artists about their work and their experience as a female, Jewish graphic artist.

Topics: Art, Writing, Memoirs
"Grandparents" by Ilana Zeffren

Graphic Details: Interview with Ilana Zeffren

by  Leah Berkenwald

Graphic Details: Confessional Comics by Jewish Women is the first museum exhibit to explore this unique niche of autobiographical storytelling by Jewish women. The touring exhibit, sponsored by The Forward, features the work of 18 Jewish women artists. The Jewish Women's Archive is interviewing each of the artists about their work and their experience as a female, Jewish graphic artist.

Topics: Art, Israel, Writing, Memoirs
"Different Combos" by Lauren Weinstein

Graphic Details: Interview with Lauren Weinstein

by  Leah Berkenwald

Graphic Details: Confessional Comics by Jewish Women is the first museum exhibit to explore this unique niche of autobiographical storytelling by Jewish women. The touring exhibit, sponsored by The Forward, features the work of 18 Jewish women artists. The Jewish Women's Archive is interviewing each of the artists about their work and their experience as a female, Jewish graphic artist.

Topics: Art, Writing
Leora Jackson, Michael Kaminer, and Sarah Lightman, 2011

Graphic Details exhibit opens in Toronto

by  Leora Jackson

Graphic Details: Confessional Comics by Jewish Women, has been getting some great press and publicity at JWA lately – and on the Canadian and Toronto news scenes. I took the streetcar to West Queen West this past Sunday to check out the exhibit on its opening weekend. Curators Sarah Lightman and Michael Kaminer were both present, and a small but steady flow of visitors wandered through four rooms in an upstairs gallery at the Gladstone Hotel to see the installations featuring the work of new and established Jewish women artists.

Topics: Art, Writing
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