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Activism

Adolphine Schwimmer-Vigeveno

In 1935, a bill prohibiting the employment of married women which was introduced in the Dutch parliament caused a dispute in the Joodsche Vrouwenraad, the Jewish Women’s Council in the Netherlands. After closely considering the issue, the president of the Jewish Women’s Council, Adolphine Schwimmer-Vigeveno deduced that, since care for the family was not a woman’s sole responsibility, the council could not subscribe to the bill.

Sylvia Bernstein Seaman

“I’m still capable of marching. I marched sixty years ago. I just hope my granddaughter doesn’t have to march into the next century.” So said Sylvia Bernstein Seaman. During her long life, she was not only a witness to but a catalyst for the dramatic changes in women’s roles and status over the course of this century.

Ottilie Schönewald

In her autobiography, Ottile Schönewald wrote, “The German Women’s Movement had the greatest influence on my life.” Deeply involved in several women’s and Jewish organizations, Schönewald was a feminist activist who became a politician to advance her causes.

Adeline Schulberg

Adeline Schulberg was a successful talent and literary agent. A committed socialist in her youth, she later became involved in child welfare, education, and other social issues.

Dominique Schnapper

Dominique Schnapper’s specialties cover numerous fields: her works, which may be categorized as historical sociology, deal with the study of minorities, unemployment and labor and, above all since the early 1990s, the nation and citizenship, all of which have been accompanied by constant epistemological inquiry.

Therese Loeb Schiff

Among her diverse activities, Therese Loeb Schiff organized a literary series for wealthy German Jewish women, donated ten thousand dollars to the National Council of Jewish Women to help cope with Jewish prostitution among young immigrant women, and lectured for the Consumers League in support of protective legislation to end child labor and the exploitation of women.

Therese Schlesinger-Eckstein

Therese Schlesinger’s life was characterized by her desire for lifelong learning and her endeavors to alter the plight of working class women. She was a dedicated feminist who was inspired by the ideals of socialism, struggling to combine both of her political passions within the Social Democratic party.

Rosa Schapire

Rosa Schapire was one of the few women to pursue art history studies at a time when the discipline itself was still in its infancy. However, she was no mere dilettante and her foray into this male-dominated profession was indicative of her allegiance to feminist aspirations to equal opportunity and adult suffrage.

Miriam Schapiro

Miriam (Mimi) Schapiro is one of the foremost pioneers in the feminist art movement in the United States. Nicknamed “Mimi Appleseed” after Johnny Appleseed whose dream was for a land where blossoming apple trees were everywhere, she has opened paths previously closed and unknown to women artists, past and present, trained and untrained.

Margherita Sarfatti

Margherita Sarfatti was born in Venice on April 8, 1880, into the wealthy and cultured Jewish Grassini family. Sarfatti was educated by private tutors, among them Antonio Fradeletto (1858–1930), the founding director of the Venice Biennale. During her childhood, she began to be interested in art and poetry, influenced by Fradeletto, who introduced her to the theories of John Ruskin.

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How to cite this page

Jewish Women's Archive. "Activism." (Viewed on April 25, 2017) <https://jwa.org/topics/activism>.

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