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Collection

Esther Herlitz

From her beginnings as a British officer and Haganah operative to her later years as an ambassador and Knesset member, Esther Herlitz shaped the essence of the young State of Israel.

Rivka Guber

Rivka Bumaghina Guber’s selflessness and her painful sacrifices for the young State of Israel earned her the title “Mother of the Sons” and the respect of the nation.

Ethel Shilmover Grossman

While serving as a member of the Army Nurse Corps in WWII, Ethel Shilmover Grossman was moved and astonished to see the kindness with which American soldiers treated wounded German POWs.

Ida Lippman

As a police officer and a lawyer, Ida Lippman influenced criminal justice both in America and in Korea, where she helped organize the women’s division of the Seoul police force.

Clara Raven

After a distinguished military career as one of the first female doctors to serve in WWII, Clara Raven went on to do pioneering research on Sudden Infant Death Syndrome.

Tamar Eshel

A lifelong diplomat with a strong record of defending women’s rights and human rights, Tamar Eshel capped her career with two terms as a member of the Knesset from 1977–1984.

Dalia Dorner

Dalia Dorner’s early commitment to human rights shaped her decade of service as an Israel Supreme Court Justice.

Rahel Yanait Ben-Zvi

Long before she became First Lady of Israel, Rahel Yanait Ben-Zvi shaped the country by helping create many of its most important organizations.

Netiva Ben Yehuda

Although she began her writing career very late in life, Netiva Ben Yehuda transformed the Israeli literary scene with her explosive Palmah trilogy.

Ruth Ben Israel

A renowned expert in Israeli labor law, Ruth Ben Israel drafted the legislation for Israel’s minimum wage and equal opportunity laws.

Dorit Beinisch

Dorit Beinisch made history as the first female president of the Israeli Supreme Court, a culmination of her many years shaping Israeli law.

Hedva Almog

As commanding officer of the Israeli Army’s Women’s Corps, Hedva Almog created training programs and promotion opportunities for female officers, working to create a better environment for the women who followed her.

Charlotte Friend

Cell biologist and immunologist Charlotte Friend furthered our understanding of cancer through her discovery of a virus that could transmit leukemia.

Käte Frankenthal

A doctor and military surgeon who smoked cigars and drank beer and whiskey, Käte Frankenthal refused to be limited to traditional women’s roles.

Mary Jacqueline Fabian

Mary Jacqueline Fabian brought opera to those who might not otherwise hear it, from directing an opera company in Birmingham, Alabama to running education and enrichment programs for a quarter of a million children in postwar Europe.

Evangelyn Barsky

One of the first two women allowed to pass the bar in Delaware, Evangelyn Barsky made a great impact on her community in her brief career.

Lisa Stein

Lisa Stein navigated aircraft in the Cold War and Desert Storm and served as an openly Jewish American officer in Saudi Arabia.

Frances Slanger

One of four nurses to wade ashore at Normandy Beach on D-Day, Frances Slanger was the only nurse to die as a result of enemy action in the European Theater.

Marita Silverman

Marita Silverman used the compassion and strength she learned working as a nurse in a field hospital in Vietnam to fuel her work in civilian life as a pediatric nurse.

Gertrude Shapiro

A nurse who put her patients before herself, Gertrude Shapiro travelled to Hiroshima to treat the injured after the city suffered an atomic blast.

Yetta Moskowitz

A pioneer of air evacuation medicine, Yetta Moskowitz received an air medal for flying over 100 hours through combat zones in New Guinea and the Philippines to evacuate wounded soldiers in World War II.

Miriam "Mimi" Miller

Miriam “Mimi” Miller resisted her family’s notions of the proper life for a nice Jewish girl, not only training as a nurse but serving in a combat zone in the Philippines through some of the worst devastation of World War II.

Vicki Lewis

Lieutenant Vicki Lewis struggled with anti-Semitism throughout her time as a weapons trainer in the US Army.

Bonnie Koppell

One of the first women rabbis ordained, Bonnie Koppell became the first woman rabbi to serve as a US military chaplain.

Bebe Koch

Wanting to somehow contribute to the defeat of the Nazis persecuting her fellow Jews, Bebe Koch enlisted at age nineteen and rose through the ranks to become a platoon commander.
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