Content type
Collection

Winona Ryder

Winona Ryder’s capacity to depict quirky characters with empathy made her a cinematic icon for outsiders throughout the 1980s and 1990s.

Margot Klausner

Co-founder of the first film laboratory in Israel, Margot Klausner helped produce some of the most important documentaries and feature films of the Zionist era.

Natalie Portman

From her early role as a child assassin in The Professional to her real-life stint at Harvard to her Oscar-winning performance in Black Swan, Natalie Portman has actively sought out professional challenges.

Amy Heckerling

Amy Heckerling’s quirky directorial style and her knack for discovering fresh angles on classic stories led to her popular and critical successes with films like Fast Times at Ridgemont High and Clueless.

Nancy Meyers

With her blockbuster hits Private Benjamin and Baby Boom, Nancy Meyers defied the conventional wisdom that a movie centered on a woman’s story wouldn’t draw audiences.

Susan Levitas

A folklorist by training, Susan Levitas has used documentary and feature films to capture unexpected facets of the cultural history of the American South, from blues musicians in Washington to Jewish boxers in Savannah.

Michal Bat-Adam

Michal Bat-Adam, the first Israeli woman director of feature films, has been hailed for her sensitive and nuanced portrayals of mental illness and women’s inner lives.

Dawn Steel

Despite struggling with studio politics, Dawn Steel’s canny sense of marketing made her a Hollywood success story as the industry’s second female studio head.

Johanna Spector

Through her scholarship and the documentary films she produced, Johanna Spector not only preserved the music of Jewish communities around the world but introduced them to new audiences.

Irene Mayer Selznick

The daughter of Hollywood magnate Louis B. Mayer, Irene Mayer Selznick went on to help her husband, David O. Selznick, run his movie production company before becoming a theater producer in her own right.

Lilly Rivlin

Lilly Rivlin has used her skills as a historian and documentary filmmaker to capture Jewish history in the making.

Jenette Kahn

Jenette Kahn rebranded National Periodical Publications as DC Comics, reviving the failing company as a proving ground for both experimental titles and reboots of iconic characters like Batman and Superman.

Amy Pascal

Amy Pascal has regularly been named one of the world’s most powerful women by Forbes and the Hollywood Reporter for her management of Sony Pictures’ run of commercial and critical successes from Casino Royale to The Social Network.

Lena Dunham

Lena Dunham became the first woman to win a Director’s Guild Award for Outstanding Director for a Comedy Series for her HBO series Girls, for which she writes, directs, produces and plays the lead character.

Sherry Lansing

Sherry Lee Heiman Lansing broke barriers as the first woman studio executive when she became head of 20th Century Fox in 1980, going on to lead Paramount Studios to create wildly successful blockbusters like Forrest Gump, Braveheart, and Titanic.

Sylvia Fine

Even after their separation in 1947, Sylvia Fine collaborated with her husband, Danny Kaye, creating playful, complex songs to support his effervescent performances on screen.

Madeline Brandeis

In her novels and movies, Madeline Brandeis offered children windows into a multitude of other cultures.

Gail Berman

Gail Berman made history as part of the youngest team of producers in Broadway history before becoming a television executive known for her genius in picking hit shows and turning failing networks around.

Barbra Streisand

Barbra Streisand’s outsized personality, combined with her voice and acting talents, made her one of the most successful performers of the twentieth century.

Bette Midler

Unapologetically bawdy, Bette Midler used elements from earlier brassy entertainers like Sophie Tucker in her comedy and music, but with a style that was all her own.

Goldie Hawn

As an actress, Goldie Hawn became known for playing dumb blondes, but behind the camera, she was determined to fulfill her vision as an executive producer and director.

Nora Ephron

Nora Ephron mined her most painful experiences to create brilliant comedies like Heartburn and When Harry Met Sally.

Ruth Hagy Brod

Ruth Hagy Brod’s varied career as a journalist, documentary filmmaker and literary agent made her the ideal publicity director for Job Orientation In the Neighborhoods, helping high school dropouts train for careers.

Gloria Greenfield

Disturbed by growing anti-Semitism in the women’s movement, Gloria Greenfield left the movement and began creating documentary films that brought national attention to anti-Semitism in America and around the world.

Shelley Morhaim

Shelly Morhaim brought national attention to anti-war and environmental causes through her documentary films and the use of one iconic photo.
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