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Collection

Vivian Maier

Although Vivian Maier’s exceptional photographs came to light only after her death, she is now celebrated as a visionary self-taught street photographer.

Gisele Freund

From her photographs of a rally in Berlin to her insightful portraits of Evita Perón, Gisèle Freund captured the people who shaped the early twentieth century.

Nan Goldin

Nan Goldin has used her photography to honor both the courage and the gritty reality of subjects ranging from drag queens to new parents.

Aenne Biermann

In her short life, self-taught photographer Aenne Biermann made a profound impact on the arts as a major proponent of “new objectivity,” a rejection of romantic idealism in favor of practical engagement with the world.

Sally Fox

Driven to document the real lives of women often ignored by male writers and historians, Sally Fox used photographs, paintings, and political cartoons to reveal the history of women at work and at play.

Doris May Ulmann

Trained to think of photography as an art form on par with painting, Doris May Ulmann captured both the celebrities of her day and the rural poor of Appalachia with what the New York Times described as “haunting power.”

Mollie Steimer

Mollie Steimer earned nationwide attention (and the admiration and friendship of Emma Goldman) for her refusal to compromise her anarchist beliefs throughout the first major trial of the Sedition Act.

Alice Schalek

Alice Schalek made a name for herself as Austria’s first female war photographer during WWI and went on to a stunning career as a photojournalist and travel writer.

Gail Rubin

Gail Rubin found her life’s passion as a photographer, documenting the beauty of Israel’s ecosystems.

Deb Perelman

Resisting trends towards fussy recipes with complicated instructions and esoteric ingredients, Deb Perelman focused her Smitten Kitchen food blog on “foolproof” recipes that incorporated feedback from online commenters.

Miriam Karpilove

Miriam Karpilove’s wildly popular Yiddish stories explored the tensions and frustrations Jewish women faced at the turn of the century—the desire for secular education, the hunger to participate in a wider culture, and the hardships of immigration.

Lotte Jacobi

A fourth-generation photographer, Lotte Jacobi became known for capturing her subjects, no matter how famous or iconic, in honest, unguarded moments.

Trude Fleischmann

Trude Fleischmann opened her own studio at age 25, worked as a successful independent photographer through the Depression, and photographed some of the great artists, thinkers, and activists of her day, including Max Reinhardt, Sinclair Lewis, Eleanor Roosevelt, and Albert Einstein.

Maya Deren

Maya Deren became one of the most important avant-garde filmmakers of her time for her use of experimental editing techniques and her fascination with ecstatic religious dances.

Madeline Brandeis

In her novels and movies, Madeline Brandeis offered children windows into a multitude of other cultures.

Ilse Bing

Ilse Bing’s experiments with the new Leica camera and darkroom techniques like polarization and cropping helped break down the boundaries between artistic photography, photojournalism, and commercial work.

Ellen Auerbach

Ellen Auerbach was remarkable both for her avant-garde photography and for her innovative and successful ringl+pit studio where she and fellow artist Grete Stern signed all their work collaboratively.

Eve Arnold

The first American woman accepted into the groundbreaking cooperative Magnum Photos, Eve Arnold was hailed for both her photojournalism and her more artistic work.

Hannah Wilke

Hannah Wilke used her art to transform perceptions of the vagina, the nude female form, and her own cancer-ridden body.

Annie Leibovitz

Annie Leibovitz’s rapport with her subjects and her genius for posing them in surprising ways has led to some of the most iconic pictures of the twentieth century and has shaped our vision of celebrities.

Diane Arbus

Wildly controversial in her lifetime, Diane Arbus was only fully recognized for her contributions to the art of photography after her death.

Joan Roth

Through her photography, Joan Roth captured powerful and unexpected images of women—from homeless women in New York to Ethiopian Jews being airlifted to Israel.

Diana Mara Henry

Diana Mara Henry photographed some of the most important events in the women’s movement, including the iconic image of the march to the First National Women’s Conference in Houston.

Gay Block

Gay Block’s photography allowed her to explore surprising facets of her subjects, from girls at summer camp to Holocaust survivors to her own mother.
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