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Melanie Klein

Melanie Klein, a pioneer of play therapy who made important discoveries about children’s emotional development, fought with Anna Freud over the differences between their theories of child psychology.

Vitka Kempner-Kovner

Zionist Vitka Kempner-Kovner helped found the United Partisan Organization (FPO) in the Vilna Ghetto and struck a blow for freedom by blowing up a Nazi train.

Karen Fox

As a rabbi and a psychotherapist, Karen Fox guides and supports clients, congregants, and students on their different journeys.

Mary Gendler

Mary Loeb Gendler has helped shape social justice movements in indirect but effective ways, from crafting new rituals for Jewish feminists to helping Tibetan exiles leverage the tools of nonviolent protest.

Anna Freud

Through her studies of children, Anna Freud shaped the fields of both child psychology and developmental psychology.

Tina Grimberg

Tina Grimberg has focused her rabbinic career on empowering women and fighting domestic violence.

Emma Nuschi Plank

Emma Nuschi Plank’s multidisciplinary approach to child development helped doctors, teachers, psychologists, and social workers find a common language to work together.

Betty Berzon

Two years after psychologist Betty Berzon came out as a lesbian in 1971, she won the fight to have the American Psychiatric Association declassify homosexuality as a mental illness.

Alexandra Fine

Using crowdfunding and cutting-edge technology, Alexandra Fine helped create the first successful hands-free couples’ vibrator in 2014 to overcome the difficulties women face in achieving orgasm during sex.

Carolyn Goodman

As a psychologist, Carolyn Goodman created early intervention programs for at-risk families, but when her son, Andrew Goodman, was killed during Freedom Summer, she became a powerful civil rights activist.

Miriam Finn Scott

Miriam Finn Scott, a child diagnostician and educator, believed that the key to child development was educating parents as much as children.

Sallyann Amdur Sack

Sallyann Amdur Sack has often been called the godmother of Jewish genealogy for creating the resources that have allowed Jews to research their heritage.

Bernice L. Neugarten

A pioneer of the study of adult development and aging, Bernice Levin Neugarten found that there was no one right way for people to grow old.

Margaret Naumburg

By creating her own school and her own system of education based on principles of psychoanalysis, Margaret Naumburg laid the groundwork for the new discipline of art therapy.

Martha Tamara Schuch Mednick

Both through her psychological research and through her collaboration with African–American, Israeli, and Arab women scholars, Martha Tamara Schuch Mednick helped long–silenced minorities express their experiences.

Margaret Mahler

Margaret Schönberger Mahler pioneered theories on child development and abnormal psychology that impacted generations of psychiatrists.

Lena Levine

From the 1930s through the 1950s, Lena Levine used her medical and psychological training to offer women advice on everything from birth control to intimacy issues.

Dr. Ruth Westheimer

Ruth Westheimer balanced unabashed practical advice about sexual health and safety with a playful sense of humor to educate the public and break down social taboos against discussing sex.

Lena Kenin

Lena Nemerovsky Kenin made major contributions to both gynecology and psychology with her successful medical practice and her groundbreaking work on postpartum depression.

Fay Berger Karpf

Fay Berger Karpf made major contributions to social science with her analysis of the history of social psychology and her discussions of Otto Rank’s theories of psychology.

Marie Jahoda

Marie Jahoda was a major figure in psychology for her work on the effects of unemployment on emotional well-being as well as the social impact of McCarthy-era blacklisting.

Frieda Fromm-Reichmann

A gifted therapist immortalized by her former patient in the novel I Never Promised You a Rose Garden, Frieda Fromm-Reichmann found new and innovative ways to treat schizophrenics.

Else Frenkel-Brunswik

Forced to flee pogroms in her childhood and the Anschluss as an adult, Else Frenkel-Brunswik strove to understand the psychological roots of racism.

Käte Frankenthal

A doctor and military surgeon who smoked cigars and drank beer and whiskey, Käte Frankenthal refused to be limited to traditional women’s roles.

Selma Fraiberg

Selma Fraiberg’s insightful work in infant psychology led to new ways to treat at-risk and “failure to thrive” infants and culminated in her classic book on parenting, The Magic Years.
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