Content type
Collection
Pima, Peggy, and Stan, Mad Men

Mad Men TV Club: Feminism is a Frilly Pink Dress

by Tara Metal

UGH. I enjoyed only one scene in this episode, and it was Don’s visit to the Francis household. Betty looked glorious in her ultra-feminine housewife drag, and I appreciated the moment when Don looked back at Betty, Henry, and his two sons, clearly farklempt about the nuclear family he could have had.

Topics: Television

Susan Sontag

Through her work as a literary and cultural critic, Susan Sontag called long-held assumptions and taboos into question.

Birth of iconoclast intellectual Susan Sontag

January 16, 1933

Declaring a “new sensibility that was “defiantly pluralistic,” Susan Sontag published wide-ranging criticism that was a force in American culture for over 40 years.  She rejected limitations o

Susan Sontag publishes last essay

May 23, 2004

Public intellectual and controversial essayist Susan Sontag published her last essay, "Regarding the Torture of Others," in the May 23, 2004, editio

Susan Sontag

In her essays, or "case-studies," examining art and the "modern sensibility," Susan Sontag covered topics from photography to illness to fascism. One of the most widely read cultural critics of her generation, she was a lightning rod for both praise and vilification.

Photographers in the United States

There is no simple way to categorize Jewish American women photographers—they are too diverse a group. They come from distinctly different political periods, economic strata, and even cultures (some were born abroad). They share neither mind-set nor style, their subjects and interests vary widely, and their worldview and art seem to have little to do with their Jewish identity.

Don’t call her Anna-Lou, or a lesbian

by  Judith Rosenbaum

In week three of my Jewish Women: A Comprehensive Historical Encyclopedia self-education program, I've been thinking about Annie Leibovitz.

Topics: LGBTQIA Rights

Assimilation in the United States: Twentieth Century

Jewish women began to assimilate into American society and culture as soon as they stepped off the boat. Some started even earlier, with reports and dreams of the goldene medine, the golden land of liberty and opportunity. Very few resisted adapting to the language and mores of the United States; those who did often returned to Europe. Well over ninety percent stayed, even those who cursed Columbus’s voyage and subsequent European settlement in North America.

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