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New York Times

Strongly Undecided

Every morning when I wake up, I immediately open the New York Times app on my phone to read the morning briefing to which I’m subscribed. I’m instantly informed of worldwide events from the past 24 hours. Then, I scroll through my Facebook feed and find out what my friends think about these same topics.

Rose Rosenberg: A Young Jewish Woman Behind the Scenes of No.10 Downing Street

Rose Rosenberg represents so many women whose names are lost to history because they worked in supportive and administrative roles rather than in the limelight, but who, in pursing work in male-dominated environments, paved the way for women to have leadership roles today. Her story gives us a richer sense of what women have done in behind-the-scenes roles and how that fits into the narratives of history’s “great men.”

Masha Gessen

Years of covering Putin’s regime in Russia made journalist Maria Alexandrovna “Masha” Gessen uniquely qualified to point out uncomfortable parallels between Putin’s leadership style and that of President Trump.

Laura Moser

After the 2016 election, journalist Laura Moser created Daily Action to mobilize and coordinate people who wanted to become active in resisting problematic policies of the Trump administration.

Rebecca Traister

In her book All the Single Ladies, Rebecca Traister investigates why so many women are choosing to remain single, and the impact single women can have on society.

Kira Radinsky

Computer scientist Kira Radinsky earned a reputation for predicting the future when she developed technology that could anticipate cholera outbreaks and student riots based on data in old newspapers.

Iphigene Ochs Sulzberger

Remembered best for her guidance to four publishers of the New York Times, Iphigene Ochs Sulzberger also helped strengthen the schools and parks of New York.

Death of Flora Lewis, “the world’s greatest correspondent”

June 2, 2002
“More and more people are coming to realize that they can choose their history. What a wonderful time to have been able to watch up close!”

Jill Abramson

As the first female executive editor of the New York Times from 2011–2014, Jill Abramson fought to change the newspaper’s culture, mentoring female reporters, choosing female bureau chiefs and focusing more attention on stories about race and gender issues.

Flora Lewis

Called “the world’s greatest correspondent” by New York Times editor A.M. Rosenthal, Flora Lewis covered the defining moments of the twentieth century and became a bureau chief for the Times.

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How to cite this page

Jewish Women's Archive. "New York Times." (Viewed on July 20, 2017) <https://jwa.org/tags/new-york-times>.

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