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Carnegie Hall

Erica Morini

Violinist Erica Morini stunned audiences from her first performance at age five to her death, when the Strad newspaper mourned her as “the most bewitching woman violinist of this century.”

Birth of Adrienne Cooper, Performer and Interpreter of Yiddish Song

September 1, 1946

Adrienne Cooper was in a way the mother of the Yiddish revival.

Ethel Stark is first woman to conduct at Carnegie Hall

October 22, 1947

Ethel Stark is first woman to conduct at Carnegie Hall

Labor History Landmark: No. 8 Carnegie Hall

The Top 11 Labor History Landmarks in New York City is a blog series on Jewesses with Attitudecreated in honor of Women's History Month and the 100th anniversary ofthe Triangle Waist Factory fire. Learn more about the series here, or check out JWA's online walking tour.

The 8th of the Top 11 Labor History Landmarks in New York City is the Carnegie Hall.

NY Times hails Carnegie Hall performance by Rosina and Josef Lhévinne

January 14, 1939

Master teacher and pianist Rosina Lhévinne performed in a two-piano recital with her husband, to mark the 40th anniversary of both their marriage and their professional collaboration.

Debbie Friedman plays Carnegie Hall

January 7, 1996

Debbie Friedman gave a sold out concert at Carnegie Hall, marking twenty-five years as one of the Jewish community's most well-known and influential contemporary musicians.

Hadassah (Spira Epstein)

“One of the finest artist gifts to come out of Israel is Hadassah,” proclaimed the Dance Congress of 1953. Hadassah was recognized as a major dance artist of the twentieth century, a performer of Jewish, Hindu and other ethnic dance forms, and a leading force in presenting the dance of other cultures to the American public. She was a pioneer in bringing Jewish dance to the United States and was recognized as such in the first U.S. Congress on Jewish Dance held in New York City in 1949.

Jeanne Behrend

In 1936, Jeanne Behrend, renowned pianist, music educator, and composer, received the Joseph Bearns Prize from Columbia University for her piano suite A Child’s Day, and for her song cycle on poems by Sara Teasdale. Behrend debuted at Carnegie Hall in 1937, performing one of her own compositions. She continued throughout her life to appear as a soloist with major orchestras. Although Behrend wrote many works for piano, voice, orchestra, and chamber ensemble, her creative efforts received little of the recognition she had hoped for, and she stopped composing in the 1940s.

How to cite this page

Jewish Women's Archive. "Carnegie Hall." (Viewed on December 17, 2017) <https://jwa.org/tags/carnegie-hall>.

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