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Profiles

Browse this section for short profiles of some of the thousands of Jewish women found throughout jwa.org. We will be adding new profiles to this section regularly and welcome your suggestions for women to add.

Showing 176 - 200 of 1519
A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P R S T U V W Y Z

Tina Blau

Inspired by Dutch masters and by the quality of light she found in the natural world on trips to Holland and Italy, Tina Blau became the only Jewish woman artist of her generation to be recognized by her peers.

Henrietta Blaustein

Through her generosity, Henrietta Blaustein created and sustained a foundation, a hospital’s maternity center, and dozens of other charitable initiatives and organizations.

Matilda and Bernice Blaustein

While 150,000 women eventually served in the Women’s Army Auxiliary Corps in World War II, Matilda Blaustein was remarkable both as one of the first to volunteer and because she was joined in the service by her daughter, Bernice.

Blanche Bloch

Blanche Bloch helped open new opportunities for women in music as both a founding member and conductor of the New York Women’s Orchestra.

Miranda Bloch

Miranda “Randy” Bloch not only served as a Marine during World War II, she was one of the rare women Marines to be issued flight orders, helping pilots and air crew train for radar bombing runs.

Adele Bloch-Bauer

A wealthy socialite and salon hostess in her day, Adele Bloch-Bauer became the center of an historic legal case when her niece demanded the return of her portrait, stolen by the Nazis.

Anita Block

As editor of the women’s page of the New York Call, one of America’s first socialist newspapers, Anita Block ensured the section covered subjects of real social and political interest to women, commenting, “It was probably the only women’s page which never printed a recipe or a fashion note.”

Gay Block

Gay Block’s photography allowed her to explore surprising facets of her subjects, from girls at summer camp to Holocaust survivors to her own mother.

Hadassah Blocker

The first woman in her synagogue to chant Haftorah, Hadassah Blocker taught hundreds of women to take part in the Torah service.

Joan Blondell

Known for playing character roles as a wisecracking, working-class girl, Joan Blondell performed in movies, television, and on stage from age one until her death.

Claire Bloom

From her first film role in Charlie Chaplin’s 1952 Limelight to her performance in 2010’s The King’s Speech, Claire Bloom has remained a favorite of many acclaimed directors.

Rachel Bloom

Rachel Bloom has combined her passion for musical theater, her gift for comedy, her feminist sensibility, and her roots in Jewish humor to create the award-winning show Crazy Ex-Girlfriend.

Helen Abrahams Blum

Helen Abrahams Blum earned a reputation as a talented painter before discovering a passion for all aspects of theater, from set design to directing.

Judy Blume

Judy Blume’s books, known for their humor and their honest portrayal of the pains of adolescence, have shaped generations of young girls.

Florence Meyer Blumenthal

Florence Meyer Blumenthal created an arts foundation that funded hundreds of promising artists and allowed them to focus on pursuing their craft.

Claire Bodner

Despite having almost no training in either fashion or business, Claire Bodner ran a successful fashion design company that was featured in the top magazines and stores in the country.

Ruth Bondy

Journalist Ruth Bondy made larger events more relatable for readers through her insightful human interest stories.

Batsheva Bonne-Tamir

By studying both isolated and mixed populations in Israel, Batsheva Bonne-Tamir uncovered the genetic histories and relationships between long-separated communities.

Heather Booth

Heather Booth helped transform the American political landscape from her early involvement in both civil rights and abortion rights through her campaign for marriage equality.

Madeline Borg

Madeline Borg dedicated her career to giving children second chances—through studying juvenile delinquency, working with child welfare and probation associations, and by founding the Big Sister movement.

Kate Bornstein

Through performance art pieces like Kate Bornstein Is a Queer and Pleasant Danger and The Opposite Sex is Neither, Kate Bornstein questions society’s understanding of gender as a binary.

Sivan Borowich-Ya'ari

Using Israeli innovations in solar technology, Sivan Borowich-Ya’ari created Innovation: Africa to bring more reliable electricity to developing communities throughout Africa.

Anna Pavitt Boudin

Anna Pavitt Boudin defied expectations throughout her career, both as one of the first women dentists in America and as the founder and president of the Women’s American ORT, one of the largest Jewish women’s organizations in America.

Jane Bowles

Admired for her darkly comic wit by writers like Truman Capote, Tennessee Williams, and John Ashbery, Jane Bowles became the center of an avant-garde circle in Morocco.

Barbara Boxer

Barbara Boxer earned a reputation as a powerful voice for liberal causes by leading the charge on issues like sexual harassment, the Iraq War, and marriage equality.

How to cite this page

Jewish Women's Archive. "Profiles." (Viewed on June 27, 2019) <https://jwa.org/people>.

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